12 popular souvenirs to purchase in Kanazawa

12 popular souvenirs to purchase in Kanazawa


2020.08.16

NAVITIME TRAVEL EDITOR

12 popular souvenirs to purchase in Kanazawa

With the opening of the Hokuriku Shinkansen, Kanazawa is becoming an increasingly popular tourist destination in Japan. It’s famed for Kenroku-en, one of the Three Great Gardens of Japan, and the Higashi Chaya District that has retained its Japanese “wa” (“harmonious”) townscape, as well as being renowned for producing around 90% of the country’s gold leaf. In this article, we’ll introduce some of the top souvenirs that can be purchased around Kanazawa Station or at the shops in Higashi Chaya District, ranging from sweet treats to nourishing beauty products.

  • 01

    Morinomi Bolo (Hohohoza Kanazawa)

    Made in the confectionary workshop of Hohohoza Kanazawa, Morinomi Bolo are made using locally sourced ingredients from Ishikawa Prefecture. There are four different flavors available, with our recommendation being their light blue “salt” flavor. They combine a sweet dough with a slightly salty taste and crumble when you put them into your mouth. Morinomi Bolo are an ideal gift for adults and cost around 400 yen per box.

    Morinomi Bolo (Hohohoza Kanazawa)

    Morinomi Bolo (Hohohoza Kanazawa)

  • 02

    Local Jam Kiwi Grown in Komatsu (stoock)

    stoock is a specialty preserved foods store that produces a luxurious kiwi jam as part of their Local×Organic Jam Series. It’s made using kiwis grown organically in Ishikawa Prefecture and is delicious when added to yogurt or dolloped on top of cheese and crackers. Jars cost around 400 yen each and can be purchased from Yaoyorozu Honpo near the Higashi Chaya District.

    Local Jam Kiwi Grown in Komatsu (stoock)

    Local Jam Kiwi Grown in Komatsu (stoock)

  • 03

    Origami Icing Cookie (Monster)

    Also available from Yaoyorozu Honpo are these icing-topped cookies created by MONSTER in Ishikawa Prefecture. They are sold in sets with five different origami motifs or you can select your favorite and purchase it in bulk. With their stylishly designed icing, these cookies are particularly popular with women and will be a welcome addition to any gift or letter for your closest friends.

    Origami Icing Cookie (Monster)

    Origami Icing Cookie (Monster)

  • 04

    Brandy Cake (Kanazawaya Coffee Shop)

    The Kanazawaya Coffee Shop is a famous coffee shop not far from Kanazawa’s Kenroku-en garden that’s garnered a reputation for its Brandy Cake (around 300 yen per piece). This adults-only treat is infused with the smell of brandy, making it an ideal gift for those who are a fan of liquor. In addition to the standard flavor, you can also find tea and cacao brandy cakes, all of which are beautifully wrapped to appear like cosmetics.

    Brandy Cake (Kanazawaya Coffee Shop)

    Brandy Cake (Kanazawaya Coffee Shop)

    Brandy Cake (Kanazawaya Coffee Shop)

    Brandy Cake (Kanazawaya Coffee Shop)

  • 05

    Ishikawa Local Cookie (HUG WORKS)

    If you’re looking for an authentically Kanazawa treat, you can’t go past the cookies from the popular bagel and baked sweets store HUG WORKS. Their ingredients (salt, soy sauce, and sake kasu) are all locally sourced, with their Sake Kasu Cookie (450 yen) made using sake brewed at the iconic Fukumitsuya brewery. They’re presented in cute packaging and are available at HUG mitten WORKS, Yaoyorozu Honpo and JR Kanazawa Station.

    Ishikawa Local Cookie (HUG WORKS)

    Ishikawa Local Cookie (HUG WORKS)

    Ishikawa Local Cookie (HUG WORKS)

    Ishikawa Local Cookie (HUG WORKS)

  • 06

    Sotto Hirakuto (Sankaido)

    Appearing like a Japanese monaka sweet, these delicate treats are made by hand and decorated with a cute picture. Inside you’ll find dried sweets, confetti and a tsujiura (fortune-telling paper) that offers some words of wisdom about your future. These adorable gifts change their appearance and contents depending on the season and cost around 900 yen for two pieces.

    Sotto Hirakuto (Sankaido)

    Sotto Hirakuto (Sankaido)

    Sotto Hirakuto (Sankaido)

    Sotto Hirakuto (Sankaido)

  • 07

    Uthiwa Senbei (Kato Koyodo)

    Made from glutinous rice, these fluffy rice crackers are elegantly designed in the shape of a fan and depict seasonal beauties of nature. There are numerous different types available, so you can gift a different one to all of your family members and friends. Each costs around 150 yen (or they can be purchased as a pack of 12 for around 1,500 yen) and they’re only available seasonally from May.

    Uthiwa Senbei (Kato Koyodo)

    Uthiwa Senbei (Kato Koyodo)

    Uthiwa Senbei (Kato Koyodo)

    Uthiwa Senbei (Kato Koyodo)

  • 08

    Kaga Hachiman Okiagari Monaka (Kanazawa Urata)

    Kanazawa Urata is a long-established Japanese confectionery manufacturer that’s been in business for more than 80 years. One of their most popular items is the Kaga Hachiman Okiagari Monaka, a sweet shaped like a traditional Kanazawa doll that’s often gifted to pregnant women as a symbol of good luck. They’re filled with plenty of anko (red bean paste) and look adorable when lined up in a row. Each cost around 150 yen and are available at JR Kanazawa Station.

    Kaga Hachiman Okiagari Monaka (Kanazawa Urata)

    Kaga Hachiman Okiagari Monaka (Kanazawa Urata)

  • 09

    Kamifusen (Takagiya)

    Filled with grape (red), lemon (yellow), white wine, and brown sugar-flavored jelly, these cute Japanese sweets are attractively presented like a jewelry box. They come with five different colored origami papers for you to test your folding skills, which makes them an ideal gift with a distinctly Japanese touch. They’re available for around 600 yen for nine pieces.

    Kamifusen (Takagiya)

    Kamifusen (Takagiya)

    Kamifusen (Takagiya)

    Kamifusen (Takagiya)

  • 10

    Kaichin (Ishikawaya Honpo)

    Made from solidified agar, these sugary sweets appear like intricate glassworks and take their name from the Kanazawa word meaning “flat marbles”. While the outside is hard, the interior has a soft, jelly-like texture. They’re made by hand at Ishikawaya Honpo, a well-known Japanese confectionery store in Kanazawa and cost 864 yen for a square, 1,836 yen for a small box and 2,160 yen for a large.

    Kaichin (Ishikawaya Honpo)

    Kaichin (Ishikawaya Honpo)

    Kaichin (Ishikawaya Honpo)

    Kaichin (Ishikawaya Honpo)

  • 11

    CHAYA cosme (Hakuza)

    If you’re looking for a non-edible souvenir, head to the Chaya Bijin store in the famous sightseeing district of Higashi Chaya. It’s well-stocked with CHAYA cosme, a line of makeup and beauty products that include lipsticks, hand creams, eye shadows, and perfumes. Some of the products are infused with gold leaf and each comes marked with a distinctive plum logo.

    CHAYA cosme (Hakuza)

    CHAYA cosme (Hakuza)

    CHAYA cosme (Hakuza)

    CHAYA cosme (Hakuza)

  • 12

    Kaga Rakugan Sabon (Mizuno Masukichi Shoten)

    Also non-edible are these face-washing soaps, which have the appearance of a Japanese sweet and are dusted with a sugar-like powder that’s actually a moisturizing ingredient. They’re available at Mizuno Masukichi Shoten in the Higashi Chaya District, with several water basins where you can try the products before you buy. Select between five different Japanese flower scents, with each soap costing from 800 yen apiece.

    Kaga Rakugan Sabon (Mizuno Masukichi Shoten)

    Kaga Rakugan Sabon (Mizuno Masukichi Shoten)

    Kaga Rakugan Sabon (Mizuno Masukichi Shoten)

    Kaga Rakugan Sabon (Mizuno Masukichi Shoten)

    Kanazawa
    place
    Ishikawa Pref

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