Hotel Gajoen Tokyo


2018.09.13

NAVITIME TRAVEL EDITOR

Hotel Gajoen Tokyo is a luxury hotel filled with extravagance and prestige. Built in 1928, the hotel is also known by the nickname “Palace of the Dragon God”. The intricate design of the hotel whisks guests to a time more lavish and lush. The hotel’s aesthetic has remained untouched since the Showa era. Now, the hotel is still used for staying guests and remains a popular wedding venue for the affluent couple. The hotel also hosts art exhibitions alongside their permanent lacquer murals and paintings in their in house museum.

  • 01

    Explore the Hyakudan Kaidan

    Explore the Hyakudan Kaidan

    Explore the Hyakudan Kaidan

    Parts of Hotel Gajoen Tokyo is also open for visitors not staying in the rooms. The hotel is well known for its art galleries and intricate architecture. The Hyakudan Kaidan is a museum open to the public which holds art exhibitions every season. Currently, the exhibition is exploring Japan’s illumination festivals, such as Aomori’s Nebuta matsuri. Their next exhibition, starting on September 21st 2018, is focusing on autumnal ikebana, or the Japanese art of floral arrangement.

    Explore the Hyakudan Kaidan

    Explore the Hyakudan Kaidan

    The Hyakudan Kaidan translates to the hotel’s most famous feature, the 100 steps. With constantly changing special exhibitions, visitors climb 99 stairs where they are rewarded with seven glamorous rooms decorated with installations from floor to ceiling. The walk up is picturesque as well. Don’t forget to look up at the ceiling, as there is artwork starting from the first step.

  • 02

    Gaze at the traditional artwork

    Gaze at the traditional artwork

    Gaze at the traditional artwork

    The artwork is not just in the museum. From the entrance, visitors will be entranced by the wooden lacquer murals that have been on display since the opening of Hotel Gajoen Tokyo. A corridor, about 100 meters long, introduces the main murals to the visitors. More murals can be found within the banquet halls, restaurants and rooms.

  • 03

    Take an art tour

    Take an art tour

    Take an art tour

    For staying guests, art tours are available. A guide shows guests both the famous artwork and some private artwork that are not available to the public. Guests are given special access to the artwork in banquet halls and private restaurant rooms that regular visitors are not able to see. The tour is an insightful and educational look at the history of Hotel Gajoen Tokyo.

    Take an art tour

    Take an art tour

    The banquet halls are Hotel Gajoen Tokyo’s greatest assets. The halls feel like a trip back in time to the Showa era but are still used today for weddings, business meetings and for tourists looking for a taste of traditional, extravagant Japan. The most famous of these rooms is located in SHUNYUKI, the hotel’s in house Chinese restaurant. The room is decorated in opulent paintings and gold fixtures with a traditional rotary table acting as the centerpiece. Eating in SHUNYUKI is the closest one could get to dining in a museum.

  • 04

    Relax in a natural paradise

    Relax in a natural paradise

    Relax in a natural paradise

    The lobby is huge with clear glass windows letting in natural daylight. The trees block any sort of city views or noise so it feels like its own natural paradise. While only a few minutes away from Meguro station, Hotel Gajoen Tokyo feels like its own Shangri-la in the middle of Tokyo. A waterfall bubbles outside the hotel and plants are placed throughout the hotel.

    Relax in a natural paradise

    Relax in a natural paradise

    Inside the lobby is the Japanese restaurant TOFUTEI, which is housed in a wooden teahouse. While located inside, the restaurant looks like it should be on sacred temple grounds. The greenery blocks out the lobby and a stream surrounds the restaurant, creating a tranquil and intimate atmosphere.

    Hotel Gajoen Tokyo
    place
    1-8-1, Shimomeguro, Meguro-ku Tokyo
    phone
    0354343837

    2020/10/07Check-in (2 persons per room)※Nightly fee per person Update date:2020/09/23

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