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Shinpuku Saikan (Main Shop) (新福菜館本店)

Shinpuku Saikan (Main Shop) is a popular ramen noodle shop that started as a food stall in 1938. It's known for its rich yet simple soy-sauce based soup with a tantalizing accent of Kujo onion added to deepen the flavor. They also have popular dark fried rice (called yaki-meshi) that's just as good as their dark hued soup.

place

Kyoto Kyoutoshi Shimogyou-ku Higashishiokoujimukaihatachou 569 (Kawaramachi / ShijokarasumaArea)

phone 0753717648
place

9:00-20:00

Review of Shinpukusaikan

TripAdvisor Traveler Rating
Reviewed:2019/12/10 Long queue but quick turnover
It’s an interesting experience for tourists to mingle with local working men slurping their noodles! Prices are most reasonable but food was too salty for my taste
Reviewed:2019/08/31 Amazing ramen
So I’ve been here a week now, stuffing my face with local delicacies including lots of ramen. Quite frankly, this one was the best I’ve had so far. As Homer Simpson would say “seven thumbs up”. Enjoy
Reviewed:2019/01/09 Favorite Ramen, Crowded, Cold, but Delicious
With a line out the door and the automatic door open to the freezing weather, our table was cold, but the noodles were hot and delicious. With seating for four or less and or counter service, our...

Recommended Guide

Details

Address
Kyoto Kyoutoshi Shimogyou-ku Higashishiokoujimukaihatachou 569 [map]
Area
Kawaramachi / ShijokarasumaArea
Phone
0753717648
Hours
9:00-20:00
Closed
Wednesday
Parking Lot
Available(4spaces)
Credit Card
Not available
Smoking
Available
Wi-Fi
Not available
Vegetarian Menu
Available
English Menu
Available

Information Sources:  NAVITIME JAPAN

Access

          There is no Station nearby. There is no Bus Stop nearby. There is no Parking nearby. There is no IC nearby.
          From major stations / airports

          Nearby Tourist Attractions

          Nearby Restaurants

          Nearby Hotels

          Kyoto Areas

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          Its wooden tea houses, shuffling geisha, and spiritual sights have seen Kyoto hailed as the heart of traditional Japan, a world apart from ultramodern Tokyo. Despite being the Japanese capital for over a century, Kyoto escaped destruction during World War II, leaving behind a fascinating history which can be felt at every turn, from the fully gold-plated Kinkakuji Temple down to traditional customs such as geisha performances and tea ceremonies, which are still practiced to this day.