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Yuki-jinja Shrine (由岐神社)

Shrine

A historic Shinto shrine established in 940 located in Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City. The shrine is also located on the grounds of the Kurumadera temple. The shrine is famous for the Kurama Fire Festival held here each year on October 22, one of Kyoto’s three most unique festivals. The main shrine and front shrine were rebuilt in 1607 by Toyotomi Hideyori. The front shrine is unusually bisected by a central passageway is a nationally designated Important Cultural Property. A great cedar tree 53 meters tall believed to be some 800 years old stands on the grounds and gives off an ethereal atmosphere. In recent years, it has come to attract a large number of visitors as a mystical power spot.

place

Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Kuramahonchou 1073 (Kurama / Kibune / OharaArea)

phone 0757411670
place

9:00-16:00(Depending on the season)

Recommended Guide

Details

Address
Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Kuramahonchou 1073 [map]
Area
Kurama / Kibune / OharaArea
Phone
0757411670
Hours
9:00-16:00(Depending on the season)
Closed
Irregular holidays
Fees
[Worship] Free
Parking Lot
Not available
Credit Card
Not available
Smoking
Not available
Estimated stay time
30-60 minutes
Infant friendly
Available
Pet friendly
Available

Information Sources:  NAVITIME JAPAN

Access

          There is no Station nearby. There is no Bus Stop nearby. There is no Parking nearby. There is no IC nearby.
          From major stations / airports

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          Kyoto Areas

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          Its wooden tea houses, shuffling geisha, and spiritual sights have seen Kyoto hailed as the heart of traditional Japan, a world apart from ultramodern Tokyo. Despite being the Japanese capital for over a century, Kyoto escaped destruction during World War II, leaving behind a fascinating history which can be felt at every turn, from the fully gold-plated Kinkakuji Temple down to traditional customs such as geisha performances and tea ceremonies, which are still practiced to this day.