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- SHIMANE PHOTO ALBUM -

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Tsuwano Castle Ruins (津和野城跡)

Castle / Ruins of Castle

Tsuwano Castle is also known by another name, “Sanbonmatsu-jo.” During the Mongol invasions of Japan the defense of western provinces was ordered, and Yoshimi Yoriyuki, who was appointed as the feudal lord of the western Iwami Yoshika area, began construction of the fortifications in 1295, and the fortress was completed after 30 years. The castle is a representative mountain castle made by removing soil from the mountain top and creating artificial trenches around the mountain peak, and is one of only a very few castles in which the Middle Age and Modern Age construction specifications are unified. The castle ruins were designated as a National Historic Site in 1942. Visitors can use a sightseeing chair lift to access the honmaru and demaru. The site offers a sweeping view of the town of Tsuwano and the gently flowing Tsuwano River.

place

Shimane Pref. Kanoashiguntsuwanochou Ushiroda (Masuda / TsuwanoArea)

place

Open 24 hours
[Sightseeing Chair lift] 9:00-16:30 (Last rise 16:20)

Recommended Guide

Details

Address
Shimane Pref. Kanoashiguntsuwanochou Ushiroda [map]
Area
Masuda / TsuwanoArea
Hours
Open 24 hours
[Sightseeing Chair lift] 9:00-16:30 (Last rise 16:20)
Closed
Irregular holidays
Fees
[Lift round trip]
[Junior high school students and older] 700yen
[Elementary School Students] 500yen
Parking Lot
Available
Credit Card
Not available

Information Sources:  NAVITIME JAPAN

Access

          There is no Station nearby. There is no Bus Stop nearby. There is no Parking nearby. There is no IC nearby.
          From major stations / airports

          Nearby Tourist Attractions

          Nearby Restaurants

          Nearby Hotels

          Shimane Areas

          around-area-map

          What Shimane prefecture lacks in size and population, it makes up for in scenery and ancient mythology. Izumo-taisha, in the middle of the prefecture, is said to be Japan’s oldest Shinto shrine, where stories that delve into the creation of the Japanese race have been passed down over centuries. The 180 Oki Islands, a 40-minute ferry ride north of Sakaiminato, offer an undiscovered paradise well off the beaten track.