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Fast fashion at FRGMT’s The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park

FRGMT The Conveni is the Hiroshi Fujiwara’s latest iteration of a string of retail spaces-cum-installations that have brought together the designer’s own work with contributions from Off-White, Undercover, Nike, White Mountaineering and Neighborhood. The POOL Aoyama came first, followed by The Parking Ginza which occupied a parking garage near Sukiyabashi Crossing. Part of a project to transform the former Ginza Sony building into Ginza Sony Park, Fujiwara’s name and the bold concept have had local hypebeasts and overseas Japanese streetwear heads scrambling to grab the latest drops.

The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park
  • The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park

    The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park

    Hiroshi Fujiwara emerged from an earlier time in Harajuku-centered street fashion, and parlayed his early success in the scene into collaborations with exclusive and hyperluxe brands like Jun Takahashi’s Undercover and Moncler. Although Fujiwara still puts out his own collaborations through Fragment Design (the FRGMT in the full name of the shop), the designer has become mainly a curator and interior designer in recent years. Conveni feels like the most advanced version of his previous pop-ups at Aoyama and Ginza.

    The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park

    The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park

    The concept at The Conveni is simple enough. Taking the format of Tokyo’s ubiquitous convenience stores (konbini in Japanese), pieces from the brands carried by the shop are repackaged as convenience store staples. The playful concept could perhaps be read as a critique of the consumer shift from Harajuku DIY godfathers’ quirky shops to Ginza luxury shopping, and maybe it says something about the commodification of street fashion—but for most that make it into the shop, that will be secondary to digging the concept and choosing a suitably washed out Instagram filter to snap the coolers.

    The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park

    The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park

    The concept itself is carried out with attention to detail, including a magazine rack with a cache of vintage fashion magazines, and legitimate snack brand collabs among the t-shirts disguised as cider. The limited edition drops are cool and everything, but it’s a real treat to sort through the shelves and find something like the FR2-branded candy cigarettes or WTAPS plastic rain poncho; and the collab with old school Ginza-based senbei shop Matsuzaki, for example fits with the concept and is a subtle nod to the neighborhood.

    The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park

    The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park

    It looks like Conveni will be around for a while, unlike Hiroshi Fujiwara’s last two projects, but the shop is still generating major heat among those that follow Japanese street fashion. Like other Tokyo shops (and unlike most hypebeast retailers in the States or Europe), Conveni has done its best to cut off the flow of it’s one-off collaborations into the overseas reselling market, and because of that, Conveni feels more like a destination than other Tokyo fashion spots: it’s unique and unless you personally lined up to cop, it’s going to be tough to get the merchandise later.

    The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park

    The Conveni at Ginza Sony Park

    But with that exclusivity and the shop’s attempt to dissuade international resellers, it can be tricky to get in for the latest drops. The first step is to download the shop’s app (it’s only available in Japanese, throwing up another hurdle), await notification, enter a lottery, wait for email confirmation and a date, time, and spot in line, and then show up with your ID (a passport is fine, but not a zairyu card).

    Ginza Sony Park ( Ginza Sony Park )
    Address
    Tokyo Chuo Ginza 5-3-1
    Phone
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