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Suikoen Ryokan

Travel from Shizuoka city via a 1940s steam locomotive (for part of the way, at least) to visit Sumatakyo Onsen, a town in Japan’s Southern Alps known for the soothing and allegedly beautifying effects of its hot springs. It’s a bit of a trip–so while you can can certainly do it all in a day, why rush? Give yourself time to truly rejuvenate by spending the night at Suikoen Ryokan, a mid-20th century inn with classic Japanese meals, vintage architecture, and its own private baths.

Index

  • Traditional Accommodations with a Twist

  • In-house Onsen

  • Tuck into Haikara-Tei

  • A Dreamy View

  • Getting There

  • Traditional Accommodations with a Twist

    Suikoen Ryokan was built in the style of the Taisho era (1911-1926), which saw increased western influence following the Meiji restoration. Though its guest rooms look and feel decidedly Japanese, some sections of the inn feature bold art deco flourishes. Accommodations look directly out into nature, of which Sumatakyo Onsen has an abundance. No matter when you visit Sumatakyo, you’ll be treated to an exceptional show of nature, like shell-pink bursts of sakura in the spring and fiery foliage in autumn. Rooms run between 12,000 and 19,000 yen, and if booked online, are scented with the aroma of burning tea leaf incense.

    Traditional Accommodations with a Twist

    Traditional Accommodations with a Twist

  • In-house Onsen

    If you’ve come for the hot springs, you’re in for a treat: Suikoen has spacious hot and cold open-air baths rich in hydrogen sulfide and sulfur, which helps soothe and heal your skin (explaining how it’s earned a reputation as a natural beautifier). Since you’re given unlimited access with accommodation, enjoy Suikoen’s baths under both the warmth of the sun the Southern Alps’ starry night sky. If you’re not a guest at Suikoen, individual entry costs only 600 yen (with a towel service).

    In-house Onsen

    In-house Onsen

  • Tuck into Haikara-Tei

    Though several cafes can be found throughout the town of Sumatakyo Onsen, guests can enjoy local Japanese cuisine without leaving the ryokan. Onsite restaurant Haikara-Tei serves a menu of fresh, local ingredients, which can be ordered a la carte or enjoyed in a full-course kaiseki meal. Notable items include grilled yamame (cherry salmon), barbecued pork marinated in miso paste, and even deer venison. Shizuoka’s world-renowned tea makes some appearances, too: in a hearty green tea hot pot or an end-of-meal sweet tea jelly.

    Tuck into Haikara-Tei

    Tuck into Haikara-Tei

  • A Dreamy View

    If you need a short break from Sumatakyo Onsen, hike several kilometres into the mountains to visit Sumatakyo Gorge’s Yume no Tsuri-bashi (translated as the delightfully hyperbolic “suspension bridge of dreams”). For the best view of the area, journey out to the centre of the crossing to see the blue-green spring waters swirling below–the bridge is narrow, which makes it an especially thrilling perch from which to take in the countryside.

    A Dreamy View

    A Dreamy View

  • Getting There

    From Higashi Shizuoka Station, take the Tokaido Line to Kanaya Station, then transfer to a charming 1940s steam engine on the Oigawa Line until Senzu Station. Finally, board a bus to Sumatakyo Onsen. Though the journey requires a few transfers, you’ll be treated to soothing views of the Oi River as you climb into the South Japanese Alps for your hot spring escape.

    Getting There

    Getting There

    Midorikurenaien
    Address
    279 Senzu Shizuoka
    Phone
    0547-59-3100

    2019/07/01Check-in (2 persons per room)※Nightly fee per person Update date:2019/06/17

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