Where to Go in Murakami Where to Go in Murakami

Where to Go in Murakami


2018.07.17

NAVITIME TRAVEL EDITOR

Where to Go in Murakami

Located in the northern part of Niigata Prefecture, the seaside city of Murakami is a quaint area with lots of natural wonder to take in. There are beautiful beaches and more fish than you can shake a rod at. Its delicious salmon aren’t the only reason people come here though. The city has been around since the 7th century and has preserved much of its cultural heritage.

  • 01

    Romantei, the Romantic Pavilion

    This private house is from the early Showa Period (1926–1989) and is open to visitors. The era this house was built in is known for its interesting marriage of Japanese and Western styles of decoration. Due to the amazing preservation of this house, it’s been designated as an important cultural asset. Most of the year, the house is closed to the public, but every year during the Murakami Doll Festival, from March 1 to April 3, the owners open the house to the public.

  • 02

    Miomote River

    Miomote River

    Miomote River

    Murakami is famous for its fish, and tourists flock to the city every year to see the thousands of salmon spawning in the Miomote River. The river runs along the northern border of the city and has served as a food source for the people of the town for thousands of years. Every year, from October until December, visitors can see local fishermen in their boats pulling salmon from the river using traditional fishing nets.

    Miomote Kawahigashi Kasen Ryokuchi Park
    place
    Niigata Murakami-shi Saberi
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  • 03

    Kikkawa Salmon Store

    Kikkawa Salmon Store

    Kikkawa Salmon Store

    As mentioned above, salmon is a big deal in Murakami. It’s become such a huge part of the local cuisine that it’s said that more than a hundred different salmon recipes are unique to the area. Once all those tasty fish are caught, many of them undergo a traditional preservation process to keep the fish good throughout the year. Dried fish has been popular in Japan much longer than raw fish, since it keeps longer without spoiling.

    Kikkawa Salmon Store

    Kikkawa Salmon Store

    One shop that specializes in traditional dried fish is the 130-year-old Kikkawa Salmon Shop. Even though the shop is just 130 years old, the Kikkawa family has been perfecting their techniques for over 400 years. The salmon are hung from the ceiling after they’re caught in the winter and are allowed to dry for a full six months before being sold.

    Sennenzake Kikkawa
    place
    Nigata Pref. Murakamishi Omachi 1-20
    phone
    0254532213
    opening-hour
    10:00-17:30
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  • 04

    Izutsuya

    Izutsuya

    Izutsuya

    After stopping in at the Kikkawa Salmon Store, you should head over to their restaurant. Owning a salmon shop probably means you know a thing or two about cooking them as well. The menu ranges from simple affordable dishes to elaborate courses. Courses start at 1,900 yen and offer an incredible variety of salmon dishes. You can even splurge on the 5,400-yen salmon course with its 21 different dishes.

    千年鮭 井筒屋
    place
    新潟県村上市小町1-12
    phone
    0254-53-7700
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    no image
  • 05

    Temples and samurai residences

    Temples and samurai residences

    Temples and samurai residences

    Murakami was a castle town in the Edo period and many of the traditional samurai houses still exist today. Murakami Castle was built on Mount Gagyu in the 7th century and the samurai that served the shogun lived in the nearby hills. Seeing the ruins of the castle and looking down over the city is certainly a wonderful experience, but you shouldn’t miss out on the opportunity to see some of the samurai houses while you’re there. Some of the residences have been designated as important cultural properties and offer tours to guests.

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