10 of the Best Things to Do in Ryogoku

Ryogoku is famous for being the neighborhood of sumo wrestling.
But there’s a lot more to the area than the excitement happening inside the Ryōgoku Kokugikan arena. The neighborhood is alive with history and culture, offering diverse activities from filling up on chanko-nabe to exploring an extensive museum on the Edo period.

In this guide we’ll cover the top 10 activities for Ryogoku to give you all the information you need for a great day out.

  • 01

    Grab a Map at the Ryogoku Tourist Information Center

    Ryogoku Area Map

    Ryogoku Area Map

    Ryogoku Tourist Information Center

    Ryogoku Tourist Information Center

    Edo Noren is a shopping center directly connected to the Ryogoku station, and the inside is a recreation of the city streets of Edo-period Japan.
    On the first floor you’ll find the Tourist Information Center, which has tourist maps of the surrounding area as well as a variety of pamphlets providing useful information, and it’s all free.

    It’s an easy first stop to make sure you’re ready for Ryogoku.

    Ryogoku Tourist Information Office
    place
    Tokyo Sumida-ku Yokoami 1-3-20 Ryogoku Edo NOREN 1F
  • 02

    Experience Sumo Wrestling

    Ryogoku Kokugikan

    Ryogoku Kokugikan

    Ryogoku Kokugikan

    Ryogoku Kokugikan

    You’ll get the sumo vibe as soon as you get off the train in Ryogoku, with pictures, murals, and even statues along the West Entrance of the station.
    Sumo tournaments at the Ryogoku Kokugikan 両国国技館 take place in January, May, and September, so if your travel plans line up then definitely get a ticket.

    If you’re visiting outside of tournament times, though, you can still book a tour to visit a sumo stable. A guide will usher you into a morning practice session, and you’ll see sumo up close and personal. Plus, after the training you can take pictures with the wrestlers for a unique souvenir distinctly from Ryogoku.

    West Entrance of Ryogoku station

    West Entrance of Ryogoku station

    West Entrance of Ryogoku station

    West Entrance of Ryogoku station

    In Ryogoku station

    In Ryogoku station

    In Ryogoku station

    In Ryogoku station

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    Early Morning Training Sumo Stable

    Early Morning Training Sumo Stable

    Popular tours: Sumo Wrestling Tokyo—Early Morning Training Sumo Stable Tour (Voyagin)

    Ryogoku Kokugikan
    rating

    4.5

    804 Reviews
    place
    Tokyo Sumida-ku Yokoami 1-3-28
    phone
    0336235111
    opening-hour
    Depends on content
  • 03

    Take a Trip Back to the Edo Period

    Edo-Tokyo Museum   「東京都江戸東京博物館」

    Edo-Tokyo Museum 「東京都江戸東京博物館」

    Edo-Tokyo Museum   「東京都江戸東京博物館」

    Edo-Tokyo Museum 「東京都江戸東京博物館」

    Edo-Tokyo Museum is an impressive location that houses extensive recreations of Edo-period scenes and detailed exhibits meant to give you a sense of what life would have been like in the Edo era.

    At the entrance to the museum is a complete replica of the Nihonbashi bridge, and crossing it to the main exhibits is like going back in time. Peek into intricate miniatures and take pictures with life-size replicationns of iconic buildings for an educational and engaging experience.

    Tickets are 600 yen, and you’ll get 20 percent off a ticket to the Sumida Hokusai Museum with your purchase.

    Edo-Tokyo Museum   「東京都江戸東京博物館」

    Edo-Tokyo Museum 「東京都江戸東京博物館」

    Edo-Tokyo Museum   「東京都江戸東京博物館」

    Edo-Tokyo Museum 「東京都江戸東京博物館」

    Edo-Tokyo Museum   「東京都江戸東京博物館」

    Edo-Tokyo Museum 「東京都江戸東京博物館」

    東京都江戸東京博物館
    rating

    4.5

    2140 Reviews
    place
    東京都墨田区横網1-4-1
    phone
    0336269974
    opening-hour
    9:30-17:30 (Saturday 19:30),…
  • 04

    Relax at the Former Yasuda Garden

    Former Yasuda Garden

    Former Yasuda Garden

    Former Yasuda Garden

    Former Yasuda Garden

    Former Yasuda Garden

    Former Yasuda Garden

    Former Yasuda Garden 旧安田庭園 is a tranquil spot with a large pond in the center, perfect to bring you back down after an intense sumo experience.
    With a history stretching back to the Edo period, the garden offers stone lanterns and a short bridge begging for photo opportunities. Ease your way around the pond to destress and get your shot of nature for the day.

    The garden is open for visitors and entrance is free. It is located a few minutes’ walk from Kokugikan

    Yokoamicho Park

    Yokoamicho Park

    Yokoamicho Park

    Yokoamicho Park

    Yokoamicho Park

    Yokoamicho Park

    Next to Former Yasuda Garden lies Yokoamicho Park 横網町公園, where you can find a memorial dedicated to all the people who lost their lives in the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake.
    There is also a small museum in the park that explains what happened during the disaster that claimed over 100 000 lives.

    Former Yasuda Garden
    place
    Tokyo Sumida-ku Yokoami 1-12-1
    Prefectural Yokoami Cho Park
    place
    Tokyo Sumida-ku Yokoami 2-chome
  • 05

    Have Lunch on a Terrace

    Athlete’s Set Menu

    Athlete’s Set Menu

    Ryogoku Terrace

    Ryogoku Terrace

    Set just off the Former Yasuda Garden, Ryogoku Terrace 両国テラス is an airy restaurant full of large windows that let in plenty of natural light.
    The terrace allows quiet views of the Yasuda Garden, and in the wintertime the tables are transformed into kotatsu, or heated tables covered with blankets.

    Dining caters to the health-conscious, but they have options like pizza and pasta, too. We recommend the Athlete’s Set Menu, 970 yen, which lets you choose 3 dishes and either rice or sliced cabbage, all coming together for a healthy meal that doesn’t skimp on portions.

    Ryogoku Terrace

    Ryogoku Terrace

    両国テラスカフェ
    place
    東京都墨田区横網1-12-21
    phone
    0356087580
    no image
  • 06

    See Ukiyo-e at Sumida Hokusai Museum

    Sumida Hokusai Museum

    Sumida Hokusai Museum

    Sumida Hokusai Museum

    Sumida Hokusai Museum

    The Great Wave off Kanagawa is one of the most iconic pieces of Japanese art, and Katsushika Hokusai is the man behind the work.

    Sumida Hokusai Museum すみだ北斎美術館 will guide you through the art of ukiyo-e 浮世絵, which are woodblock prints featuring images ranging from natural scenes to kabuki actors.
    The museum itself is a modern affair with interactive digital exhibits that allow you to explore Hokusai’s work, and there are also exhibits offering full-sized replicas of Hokusai and his many studios.

    Entrance is 400 yen, and it’s open Tuesday to Sunday from 9:30 am to 5:30 pm.


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    Sumida Hokusai Museum

    Sumida Hokusai Museum

    Sumida Hokusai Museum

    Sumida Hokusai Museum

    Sumida Hokusai Museum
    place
    Tokyo Sumida Kamezawa 2-7-2
    phone
    0357778600
  • 07

    Shop for Trendy Japanese Souvenirs

    MERIKOTI

    MERIKOTI

    MERIKOTI

    MERIKOTI

    Around the corner from the Hokusai Museum lies MERIKOTI, a colorful shop dedicated to modern interpretations of traditional Japanese knitted footwear.
    Merikoti specializes in knitted Japanese sandals that are meant to be worn in the house, and they’ve devised bright, new patterns to update this craft into a trendy fashion statement. Plus, they have toe socks.

    A pair of house shoes from Merikoti will run you 7,560 yen, which is a bit on the expensive side, but each pair is uniquely handcrafted. You can even attend a workshop where you can make your own pair for 5,400 yen. Reservations can be made online or by phone.

    MERIKOTI

    MERIKOTI

    MERIKOTI
    place
    Tokyo Sumida-ku Kamezawa 1-12-10 Hirai Building 1F
    phone
    07069860708
  • 08

    Unwind in a Bathhouse with Skytree Views

    Mikokuyu

    Mikokuyu

    Mikokuyu

    Mikokuyu

    Mikokuyu 御谷湯 is stylish Japanese bathhouse with contemporary trappings. Ease into one of their natural hot spring baths to relieve some stress and soothe muscles sore from walking all over Ryogoku. Of particular note is the all-natural, coffee-colored black baths, which have been headliners of Mikokuyu since its opening.

    Entrance is 460 yen, with rental towels costing another 30 yen, but you can simply show up as you are, no preparation needed. Tattoos are allowed, and foreign clientele often visits.
    Being able to see Skytree while soaking in the warm water is a special treat.

    Mikokuyu

    Mikokuyu

    Mikokuyu

    Mikokuyu

    Mikokuyu
    rating

    4.5

    24 Reviews
    place
    Tokyo Sumida-ku Ishiwara 3-30-8
    phone
    0336231695
  • 09

    Try Ryogoku’s Famous Chanko-Nabe

    Chanko-Nabe

    Chanko-Nabe

    Big eaters will love chanko-nabe ちゃんこ鍋.
    The special type of hot pot, or nabe, normally uses a chicken-based broth full of meat, vegetables, and tofu designed specifically to pack pounds onto sumo wrestlers.
    Despite being calorie-rich, the chanko-nabe is very healthy, often having fish and a variety of greens to balance the high protein content.

    Chanko Tomoegata

    Chanko Tomoegata

    Chanko Tomoegata

    Chanko Tomoegata

    Chanko Tomoegata

    Chanko Tomoegata

    Chanko Tomoegata ちゃんこ巴潟 has been in business for about 40 years, and they offer a traditionally Japanese take on chanko-nabe, featuring simply seasoned side dishes to complement the hot pot. You can even get sashimi with your chanko.
    You certainly won’t leave Ryogoku hungry.

    ちゃんこ巴潟
    place
    東京都墨田区両国2-17-6
    phone
    0336325600
    no image
  • 10

    Sake tasting at Tokyo Shouten

    Tokyo Shouten

    Tokyo Shouten

    Vending machines

    Vending machines

    Situated on the first floor of Edo Noren shopping center is Tokyo Shouten 東京商店, a lively spot where you can taste a variety of sake poured from vending machines.
    A glass of sake ranges from 200 to 400 yen, meaning that you can try all kinds of sake without breaking the bank. They offer choice brands of sake that have a hoppy or beer-like flavor, too, and you can order a side dish or two when you get a bit nibbly.

    Should you try a brand that you’re particularly fond of, pick up a bottle at their sake shop and take it home with you.

    Kinds of sake

    Kinds of sake

    Edo Noren

    Edo Noren

    東京商店
    place
    東京都墨田区横網1-3-20 両国 江戸NOREN 1F
    phone
    03-5637-8262
    no image

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