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Temple Spots in Tokushima Area

  • Ryozen-ji Temple (Starting point for the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage)
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    4.0
    141 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Narutoshi Oasachoubandou Tsukahana 126
    Ryozen-ji Temple is a Koya-san Shingon Buddhist temple that, according to legend, was founded by the monk Gyoki during the Tempyo era (729–749) on the orders of the Shomu Emperor. The Temple’s formal name is Zikuwazan Ichijoin Ryozenji. Selected for inclusion in the “88 Best Places to Visit in Tokushima,” the Ryozen-ji Temple is also the starting-point for the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage, and is affectionately known as Ichi-ban-san (“Number One”). The Temple is visited by white-robed pilgrims throughout the year, and it is possible to purchase Nokyo-cho (stamp-books for collecting the stamps that confirm that a pilgrim has made a donation to a given temple) and pilgrims’ clothing, staffs and bamboo hats etc. Must-see sights at the Temple include a two-storied pagoda housing the Gochi Nyorai Statues (five statues representing different aspects of the wisdom of the Buddha) and the Meiji Garden located on the north side of the Daishi-do hall.

    Ryozenji is temple 1 and where most henro start off. The grounds are a bit cluttered but charming nonetheless. You can "practice" your set of rituals here -- bell ringing, candle and incense...

  • Gokurakuji Temple
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    4.0
    42 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Narutoshi Oasachouhinoki Dan'no on 12
    The Gokurakuji Temple is a Koya-san Shingon Buddhist temple located in the Oasa-cho Hinoki district of Naruto City; legend has it that the Gokurakuji Temple was founded by the bodhisattva Gyoki during the Konin era (810–824). The temple’s formal name is Nissho-san Muryoju-in. The Gokurakuji Temple is the second temple visited on the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage. Famous sights inside the Temple complex include a beautiful Japanese garden built to evoke the Pure Land (Buddhist heaven), a Buddha statue praying to which is believed to ensure safe and trouble-free childbirth, and the Cedar of Longevity, which is said to have been planted by Kobo Daishi.

    The Daishido and Hondo can be reached via stone stairs. Do not miss the centuries old camphor tree and the small "wishing" jizo placed outside the Hondo. Lovely temple set up right at the foothills...

  • Temple No. 3, Konsenji Temple
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    4.0
    32 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Itanogunitanochou Otera Kameyamashita 66
    The renowned monk Gyoki is said to have carved the main Buddha statue at this temple during the Tempyo era (729–749) on the orders of the Shomu Emperor, after which the temple was known as Konkomyoji. The name of the temple was changed to Konsen-ji (“Golden Spring Temple”) after Kobo Daishi visited the temple during the Konin era (810–824); during his visit, to relieve a drought that was affecting the area, Kobo Daishi dug a well, from which gushed forth a spring of golden-colored sacred water. Following a program of temple rebuilding initiated by the Kameyama Emperor (who had become a devout Buddhist), the formal name of the temple was changed to Kiko-zan (reflecting the Emperor’s name). In 1582, most of the temple buildings (excluding the Daishi-do hall) were burnt down by soldiers under the command of the warlord Motochika Chosokabe; the building that visitors see today date from after this destruction. The Konsen-ji is the third temple visited on the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage. The temple is located around one kilometer from Itano Station on the JR Kotoku Line.

    もみじがいい感じに植えられているので期待して出かけましたが、暖かい日が続いていたためか色づきがまだまだのようでした。

  • Temple No. 13, Dainichiji Temple
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    3.5
    24 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Tokushimashi Ichinomiyachou Nishichou 263
    Located in the Ichinomiya-cho district of Tokushima City, the Dainichi-ji Temple is the 13th temple visited on the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage, and the fifth temple visited on the Shikoku 33 Kannon Temples Pilgrimage. The temple’s formal name is Oguri-san Kezo-in; the temple belongs to the Daikaku-ji school of the Shingon sect of Buddhism. The name Dainichi-ji derives from the story that, in 815, when Kukai was performing the homa fire ritual in Daishi-ga-mori, the Dainichi Nyorai Buddha appeared to him and told him that, as the place where he was standing was a sacred spot, he should build a temple there; Kukai therefore carved a statue of Dainichi Nyorai as the principal object of veneration for the new temple. During the Tensho era (1573–92), the temple buildings were entirely destroyed by the armies of Motochika Chosokabe. The temple was subsequently rebuilt on the orders of Mitsutaka Hachisuka, the third lord of the Tokushima han (domain). The Dainichi-ji Temple later became the betto-ji (Buddhist temple associated with a Shinto shrine) of the Ichinomiya Shrine, and during the Edo period it was the Ichinomiya Shrine that was visited as part of the 88-temple Pilgrimage, rather than the Dainichi-ji Temple. As a result of the state-ordered separation of Shintoism and Buddhism in the Meiji period, the statue of Kannon (the Goddess of Mercy) with eleven heads that had been venerated at the Ichonomiya Shrine was moved to the Dainichi-ji Temple and became the main object of veneration there, with Dainichi Nyorai playing an ancillary role.

    At the end of a quiet mountain road is this pretty temple which is number 4 on the pilgrimage. It's a 2 km or so walk from the Rakan bus stop.

  • Temple No. 5, Jizoji Temple
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Itanogunitanochou Rakan Hayashihigashi 5
    The Jizo-ji Temple is an Omuro Shingon Buddhist Temple located in Itano Town, Itano District, Tokushima Prefecture. It is the fifth temple visited on the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage; the temple’s formal name is Mujin-zan Shogo-in. The Jizo-ji Temple is renowned for the 500 Arhat statues in the Okuno-in Hall.The temple is said to have been founded in 821 by Kobo Daishi (Kukai) on the orders of the Saga Emperor; Kobo Daishi personally carved a statue of the Shogun Jizo bodhisattva (approximately 5 cm high) to be the temple’s main object of veneration. Subsequently, Jokan Shonin, the officiating monk for Kumano Gongen, carved a statue of the Enmei Jizo bodhisattva (approximately 80 cm high) from Kumano Gongen’s sacred tree, and the statue of the Shogun Jizo bodhisattva carved by Kobo Daishi was placed inside this new statue. The temple thrived under the patronage of devout warlords, until it was destroyed by the armies of Motochika Chosokabe. The buildings that the visitor sees today date from the Edo period, when the temple was rebuilt on the orders of the Hachisuka family (the lords of the Tokushima domain).
  • Yakuo-ji Temple
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    4.0
    65 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Kaifugunminamichou Okugawauchi Teramae 285-1
    The Yakuo-ji Temple is a Koya-san Shingon Buddhist temple located in Okugawauchi, Minami-cho, Tokushima Prefecture. It is the 23rd temple visited on the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage; the temple’s formal name is Iozan Muryoju-in. According to legend, the temple was founded in 726 by the Buddhist monk Gyoki on the orders of the Emperor Shomu. The main object of veneration at the Yakuo-ji Temple is a statue of the Yakushi Nyorai Buddha (Medicine Buddha), and praying at the temple is believed to be very effective at warding off evil. The main hall is reached by two flights of stone steps: the Onna-yaku Zaka (33 steps) and the Otoko-yaku Zaka (42 steps). Further on, the Yugi-to pagoda houses an exhibition room and observation platform; downstairs, pilgrims worship by walking round the Yakushiji Sanzon (a triad of three Buddha statues).

    If you had visited others temple before this one has something new to offer! Apart from the huge red pilar that can be seen from a long distance, you have in the inside of that pilar an interesting...

  • Temple No. 8, Kumadaniji Temple
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    4.0
    32 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Awashi Donarichoudonari Maeda 185
    The Kumadani-ji Temple is a Koya-san Shingon Buddhist temple located in Awa City. Its formal name is Fumyo-zan Shinko-in; it is the eighth temple visited on the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage. It is said that when the monk Kobo Daishi was meditating near here in 815, Kumano Gongen appeared to him and presented him with a gold statue of Kannon (the Goddess of Mercy) about 5 cm in height. Praying three times after each stroke of the wood-carving knife, Kobo Daishi carved a life-size statue of Senju Kannon in sacred wood, and placed the gold statue that he had received inside it, before building a temple to house the statue. These statues thus became the main object of veneration at the Kumadani-ji Temple. Unfortunately, the statues were destroyed in a fire that burnt down the Hon-do (main hall) of the temple in 1927; the statue that the visitor sees today was installed in 1971.

    こちらの見どころは、まず、はじめにくぐります山門で、木造作りの山門では四国霊場最大です。県指定の重要文化財にもなっています。また、中門の手前にあります多宝塔も色彩豊かな造りで、四国地方最大級の大きさでもあり、見ごたえ十分です。

  • Temple No. 10, Kirihataji Temple
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    4.0
    32 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Awashi Ichibachoukirihata Kannon 129
    The Kihata-ji Temple is a Koya-san Shingon Buddhist temple in Awa City. It’s formal name is Tokudo-zan Kanjo-in; it is the 10th temple visited on the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage. According to legend, when the monk Kobo Daishi was practicing asceticism in this area, he asked a weaver’s daughter to give him some fabric offcuts to patch his monk’s robe with; in order to give him offcuts, the girl generously cut up the piece of cloth that she had just finished weaving for him to use. In return for her kindness, Kobo Daishi offered to carve a statue of Senju Kannon (Thousand Armed Avalokiteshwara) for the repose of her parents’ souls. When he performed the kanjo ceremony while bestowing the statue on the girl, she instantly attained Buddhahood and took on the likeness of Senju Kannon. The temple’s name and formal name both derive from this legend. Besides the statue of Senju Kannon in the Hon-do (main hall) which is the main object of veneration at the temple, Senju Kannon Bosatsu is also worshipped here in the form of a Bodhisattva.

    本卦還りを迎えた今、 自分への総括を問いかけることが、遍路への理由の一つだろうか。 第十番札所の切幡寺。 山麓から本堂まで「是より三三三段」・・ 崇高で、厳しく、厳粛な古刹。 いきなり自分の弱さを曝け出してしまった。

  • Temple No. 7, Jurakuji Temple
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    4.0
    29 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Awashi Donarichoutakao Houkyouden 58
    Juraku-ji Temple is a Koya-san Shingon Buddhist temple in Awa City. It’s formal name is Komyo-zan Rengei-in; it is the seventh temple visited on the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage. According to tradition, the temple was founded by Kobo Daishi. The name “Juraku-ji” (“Ten Joys Temple”) derives from the idea that, thanks to the mercy of the Amithaba Buddha, people can overcome the “eight sorrows” of birth, age, sickness, death, the pain of meeting people you dislike, the pain of separation, the pain of not getting what one wants, and pain caused by the five skandha (aggregates of mental and physical characteristics), and experience the “Ten Joys” of the Pure Land (paradise). Originally a very large temple, the Juraku-ji Temple was burnt down by the armies of the warlord Motochika Chosokabe in 1582. Only the temple’s main statue was saved, by being carried off by the head priest Shinzen on his back. The temple was rebuilt in 1635; these are the buildings that the visitor sees today.

    This is the 7th temple on the 88 temple pilgrimage and just a 15 minute walk from temple 6. The hondo is very interesting and there is a jizo that is said to cure eye problems. Also a very good...

  • Horin-ji Temple
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    3.5
    26 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Awashi Donarichoudonari Tanaka 198-2
    The origins of this temple lie in a temple founded by Kobo Daishi after encountering a white snake while on a preaching tour; this “Hakuda-san Horin-ji” was located about 4km north of the present Horin-ji Temple near the Hochi-ga-tani. In 1582 the original temple was burnt down by the armies of the warlord Motochika Chosokabe; the temple was rebuilt on its present site at some point in the Tempo era(1644–1648), and was given the name Horin-ji. The new temple was accidentally burnt down in 1859; the temple buildings that the visitor sees today were built in the Meiji era. The statue of Shaka Nyorai (Gautama Buddha) which is the main object of veneration in the temple depicts Shakyamuni in a reclining posture; the Horin-ji Temple is the only one of the temples on the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage to feature this type of statute. Situated amidst peaceful farmland, the Horin-ji Temple is affectionately known as “Horin-san Amidst the Fields.”

    こちらのお寺では、昔に、松葉杖でしか歩けない方が、参拝に来られた時、参道の真ん中あたりまで来ますと、足が軽くなり動くようになり、その後、足の悪いのは完治したと言う逸話が残っており、本堂には、たくさんの草鞋が奉納され、足腰の悪い方たちの有名な祈願場所になっています。また、剣客祈願の願いを掛けた草履も売られており、お守りとして持ち帰られます。

  • Tomei-zan, Dogaku-ji Temple
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Myouzaigunishichou Ishi Jounouchi 605
    The Dogaku-ji Temple is a Zentsu-ji sect Shingon Buddhist temple in Ishii Town. The temple’s formal name is “Tomei-zan.” It is ranked second out of the 20 Fudasho Bangai (temples not included in the official list of the temples making up the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage), and is the 11th temple visited of the 36 temples in the Shikoku Fudo Pilgrimage. The name “Dogaku-ji” (“Child’s Learning Temple”) relates to the fact that the monk Kobo Daishi studied calligraphy and other academic disciplines as child; praying at the temple was believed to bring academic success. Within the temple grounds there is a sacred spring which is reputed to have sprung forth from the ground when Kobo Daishi prayed for water to wash his ink-slab with; inside the head priest’s quarters there is a shoin-style garden (designed to be viewed from the shoin, or study) which is believed to have been created in the Muromachi period. The Dogaku-ji Temple is around 30 minutes’ walk from Ishii Station on the JR Tokushima Line.
  • Temple No. 14, Jorakuji Temple
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    4.0
    24 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Tokushimashi Kokufuchou Enmei 606
    The Joraku-ji Temple is a Koya-san Shingon Buddhist temple; its formal name is Seiju-zan Enmei-in. The Joraku-ji Temple is the 14th temple visited on the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage; it is the only one of the 88 temples that is dedicated to the bodhisattva Maitreya. According to tradition, when Kobo Daishi was meditating in this area, he saw a vision of the Miroku-bosatsu (Bodhisattva Maitreya), accompanied by numerous other bodhisattvas, expounding Buddhist doctrine; Kobo Daishi carved a statue of Maitreya in sacred wood, built a temple, and set up the statue as the main object of veneration in the temple. The temple was subsequently expanded by Kobo Daishi’s disciples Shinzen Sojo and Kishin Shonin. During the Tensho era (1573–1592), the temple was burnt down by the armies of Motochika Chosokabe; it was rebuilt in 1659 on the orders of Hachisuka Mitsutaka, the lord of the Tokushima domain. Within the temple grounds, there is a stone Buddha statue ensconced in the branches of a huge araragi (Japanese Yew) tree, which is venerated as “Araragi-Daishi.”

    Very good temple to visit. It's busy as it is on the pilgrim trail, but had lovely outdoor areas where you can feel how old the place is. Though be careful with the names of temples as there are...

  • Joroku-ji Temple
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Tokushimashi Jourokuchou Jouryou
    The Joroku-ji Temple is a Soto-school Buddhist temple located in Tokushima City. The temple’s honorific “mountain name” is Zuirin-zan; its full formal name is Zuirin-zan Jiun-in Joroku-ji; it is the 24th temple on the Awa-Chichibu Kannon Temples 34-temple Pilgrimage. According to the temple’s own traditions, the Joroku-ji Temple was founded in 650, making it a very ancient temple. Besides the Hon-do (main hall), there are many National Important Cultural Properties in the temple, including the Sanmon gate, the Kannon-do hall, and the Kyozo (Scripture House), and as a result the Jorouku-ji Temple has become known as the “Awa region’s Horyu-ji Temple” (the Horyu-ji Temple in Nara is famous for its antiquity and its many treasures). The bloodstained floorboards from the treacherous attack on Shingai Sanetsuna by Motochika Chosokabe in the temple in 1582 have been preserved as part of the ceiling of the Tokuun-in hall; dark patches that are believed to be the vestiges of the bloodstains from the victims’ hands and feet can still be seen today.
  • Hashikura-ji Temple
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    4.0
    1 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Miyoshishi Ikedachoushudu Kuratani 1006
    "This ancient Buddhist temple, a special head temple of Shingon Buddhism, is reached by taking the Hashikurasan Ropeway a 10-minute walk from Hashikura Station on the JR Dosan Line. Records state the temple was founded to enshrine a statue personally carved by the great monk Kobo Daishi to serve as its principal object of worship in 828 after he received a sign from the god Konpira. Also known as the ""Inner Sanctuary of Konpira,"" the temple is one of the stations on the Shikoku 20 Bekkaku Temple Pilgrimage and is visited by many pilgrims traveling the route. The temple is famous for its ceremonies such as an esoteric star ceremony which involves praying to the celestial body which will govern your fortunes for the year; and a memorial service for old chopsticks held on August 4th, the day of chopsticks. Many of the temple's buildings, such as its main temple building and Gomaden hall, have been designated national and prefectural Important Cultural Properties."

    徳島県三好市にあるお寺で、四国霊場の一つです。お寺に行くには麓からはロープーウェイを利用することが出来ます。また景色も堪能する事が出来ます。

  • Shosanji Temple
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    4.5
    35 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Myouzaigunkamiyamachou Shimobun Underground 318
    This temple of the Chisan sect of Shingon Buddhism is located in Kamiyama Town in Myozai County, Tokushima Prefecture, and it is the 12th temple of the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage. It is known for its position near the difficult-to-reach eighth station of Mt. Shosanji, which has an altitude of 938 meters, but nowadays there is a roadway leading to it. According to temple legend, it was founded by a pilgrim in the Asuka period. Afterward, Kukai is said to have sealed an enormous snake that had been terrorizing the villagers in a rock cavern near the summit, after which he built the temple. A three-headed statue of Daikokuten (god of wealth), said to be Kukai himself, is enshrined inside the Sanmen (three-headed) Daikoku Hall. The temple grounds contain several large cedar trees said to be hundreds of years old, and the area has been designated a Natural Monument.

    Worth a visit, but don't expect there to be much there. The temple, while pretty enough, is spoiled a little by the presence of vending machines and signs and whatnot. Quite a trek up through the...

  • Unpenji Temple
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Miyoshishi Ikedachouhakuchi Norochi 763
    This temple belongs to the Omuro sect of Shingon Buddhism and is located in Ikeda Town in Miyoshi City, Tokushima Prefecture near the summit of Mt. Unpenji, and it is the 66th temple of the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage. It has the highest altitude of all the temples in the Shikoku Pilgrimage. It is said to have been erected by a 16-year-old Kukai in 789 when he visited the area. Afterward, under orders from Emperor Saga, he is said to have sculpted the principal image of Senju Kannon Bosatsu in 818 and performed the seven sacred rites. On the temple grounds, the principal image joins a standing statue of Vaisravana and other National Important Cultural Properties, and you’ll also find a statue of Gohyakurakan, a “wish-granting eggplant,” and other items worth seeing. This temple is known for its beautiful fall foliage, and a ropeway operates from the foot of the mountain.
  • Kakurinji Temple
    rating-image
    4.0
    25 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Katsuragunkatsurachou Ikuna Washigao 14
    This is a Koyasan Shingon school temple in Katsuura-cho, Katsuura County in Tokushima Prefecture and is 20th temple of the 88 sacred places on the Shikoku Pilgrimage. It is located high on a mountain with a distant view of the mountains of Awaji and Wakayama as well as the Pacific Ocean and the front avenue is difficult to climb with a sharp slope called the Pilgrim Knock-down. The temple was built by Kobo Daishi in 798. It is said that he found a golden jizo bodhisattva protected by two white cranes in the forest which he placed inside a statue of the jizo bodhisattva that he made himself and this became the principal object of worship at the temple.

    お遍路初心者でございます。 発心の道場とされる霊場一国巡りを終え、 中でも切幡寺に焼山寺、そしてご来光を拝みながら 奉拝した鶴林寺は心の変化を求める私にとって 忘れることのできない古刹でした。 元年となる新春は いよいよ修行の道場へ 合掌・・ 。

  • Fujiidera Temple
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    3.5
    28 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Yoshinogawashi Kamojimachouino 1525
    This temple belongs to the Rinzai sect of Myoshinji Temple and is located in Kamojima Town, Yoshinogawa City, Tokushima Prefecture, and it is the 11th temple of the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage. It is said that in 815, Kukai, at the unlucky age of 42, sculpted a statue of Bhaisajyaguru and constructed the hall to help stave off bad luck for himself and all living things. The five-colored wisteria that Kukai is said to have planted on the temple grounds are the origin of the temple’s name, and they bloom in late April every year. The principal image has been designated an Important Cultural Properties and is beloved by locals for its evil-warding properties. The unryu (dragon and cloud) painting on the ceiling of the main hall is a must-see. There is a treacherous path called the “henro korogashi (falling pilgrim)” that leads to Shosanji Temple, the 12th temple on the pilgrimage.

    こちらは、山門をくぐり境内に入りますとすぐ右側に立派な藤棚があります。この藤は、弘法大師様のお手植えによるものとされています。いつも参拝するときは、藤のシーズンではないので、見事に咲き誇った藤棚を見たことはありませんが、4月下旬からゴールデンウイークが見ごろだそうです。

  • Byodoji Temple
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    4.0
    25 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Ananshi Aratanochou Akiyama 177
    This is a Koyasan Shingon school temple in Aratano-cho, Anan City, Tokushima Prefecture and is 22nd temple of the 88 sacred places on the Shikoku Pilgrimage. The origin of this temple is said to be that, at this site, Kobo Daishi found a Bhaisajyaguru and carved his own statue of it, building the temple and making it the principal object of worship. The milky water that welled up at this time (it is now clear and colorless) became known as Kobo’s Miracle-working Water effective for all kinds of ailments and many worshippers put it in containers and take it home. The main hall, which was reconstructed in the middle of the Edo period, has a painted ceiling depicting the traditional themes of natural Japanese beauty.

    「新野」の地は、叔父が長い間高校で教鞭をとっており、何度か行きましたが、この年になって初めて22番札所に行きました。ここでは本堂外陣天井絵でしょう。草木の歴史ある絵で、鮮やかに自分を見つめているようです。

  • Tatsue-ji Temple
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    4.0
    25 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokushima Pref. Komatsushimashi Tatsuechou Wakamatsu 13
    Tatsue-ji Temple is a Koyasan Shingon Buddhist temple in Tatsue Town, Komatsushima City, Tokushima Prefecture and is the 19th temple of the Shikoku 88-temple Pilgrimage. In 747 priest Gyoki carved a small statue of the Enmei Jizo as the principal image and built a pagoda for the Jizo to pray for smooth delivery for Empress Komyo. In 815 Kobo Daishi carved a large Jizo Buddha statue and put the principal image in its womb. Apart from many worshippers praying for an easy birth the temple is also famous as a “General Checkpoint of Shikoku” where wicked people were punished. The pictures on the ceiling in the main hall drawn when the temple was restored in 1977 are a must see. On the grounds there is the Kuro Kami Hall which is said to have remains of the hair pulled from women who were unfaithful to the morality.

    四国八十八カ所の根本道場とされ、邪悪な心の持ち主や罪を犯している者が訪れると罰がくだされるとされています。言い伝えの話では、大昔、夫がありながら不倫をしていたお京と言う女がおり、ある日、男と手引きをし夫を殺し、駆け落ち、自害もしきれず巡礼をしながらも、この寺へと、たどり着き地蔵尊を拝もうとした時、お京の髪は逆立ち鐘の緒に巻き上げられて、慌てて懺悔をし、命が助かったお京は、この寺で出家をし生涯を終え...

Tokushima Main Areas

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The southeastern corner of Shikoku is home to Tokushima prefecture, a region celebrated for its luscious nature and the nation's favorite Awa Odori, an energetic dance to which an annual summer festival has been dedicated. Keeping the upbeat tempo, whirlpools excite the Naruto sea off Tokushima, while inland, dramatic cliffs line the Iya Valley, promising unrivaled views of vast and vibrant scenery.

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