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Shrine Spots in Hyogo Area

  • Izanagi Jingu Shrine
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    4.5
    201 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Awajishi Taga 740
    "This Shinto shrine is Japan's oldest and is dedicated to Izanagi and Izanami, the husband and wife gods stated to have created Japan according to the ancient ""Kojiki"" and ""Nihon shoki."" This shrine is also the only high status imperial ""jingu"" shrine in Hyogo Prefecture. A split ""husband and wife"" giant camphor tree on the grounds is 900 years old and believed to grant worshippers such blessings as matrimonial happiness, easy childbirth, and luck in finding love and marriage. Each month on the 22nd, the shrine is specially opened to visitors at night, and the main shrine and torii gate are lit up, while candles along the approach to the shrine create a magical atmosphere. During the cherry blossoming season, the shrine lights up its cherry trees at night and holds a ""Sakura Kairo Museum"" event with stage performances."

    We drove from Somoto where we stayed. Upon arrival, two carpark were available. Maybe it was Sunday, some ceremonial event tajen place. We strolled along the side entrance since we parked our car...

  • Ikuta Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyogo Pref. Koubeshi Chuou-ku Shimoyamatedori 1-2-1
    This is a shrine located in Kobe City. The shrine has a history of more than 1,800 years dating back to the time of Empress Jingu, and its founding is also noted in the “Nihon Shoki” (second oldest book of classical Japanese history). It is famous as a shrine which brings love to a happy conclusion, and is also famous for marriage and prayers for easy childbirth; the shrine is fondly known by the pet name of “Ikuta San”. The vermilion-lacquered columns of the tower gate and the main shrine are impressive, so the shrine is also popular as a ceremonial hall for Shinto weddings. Many worshipers visit throughout the year and flock to the temple for the first shrine visit of the New year.
  • Head shrine of the Ebisu sect of Shinto, Nishinomiya-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    239 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Nishinomiyashi Shakechou 1-17
    "This is the head shrine of the Shinto lineage dedicated to the god Ebisu. It's about a five-minute walk southwest from the south exit of Hyogo Prefecture's Nishinomiya Station on Hanshin Electric Railway's Main Line. Locally called ""Nishinomiya-no-Ebessan,"" its primary deities include Ebisu Okami and Amaterasu Omikami. Features include a large front gate called the ""Red Gate"" that was supposedly consecrated by Toyotomi Hideyori, the main shrine dedicated in 1663 by the fourth shogun Ietsuna, and Ebisu-no-Mori, a grove covering a portion of the precincts. The grove is a Prefectural Natural Treasure and the main shrine is a National Treasure. Events include the Toka Ebisu Festival and the shrine's main annual festival, as well as the famous Kaimon Shinji Fukuotoko Erabi ritual (an annual race to determine the year's lucky man) that draws a huge crowd every year."

    Ive been on the busiest night and the crowd is massive. Its all fun but might be a bit of a struggle for anyone with young children, the aged or infirm. Lots of colorful and interesting sights. I...

  • Hiruko Shrine (Yanagihara Ebisu Shrine)
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Koubeshi Hyougo-ku Nishiyanagiwarachou 5-20
    "A Shinto shrine located next to the site of the Yanagihara Somon gate a five-minute walk from the south gate of JR Hyogo Station and a 10-minute walk from Kobe Rapid Transit Railway Shinkaichi Station and Daikai Station. Locals know the shrine as ""Yanagihara no Ebessan."" Dedicated to Ebisu and Omononushi no Okami, the shrine is believed to aid worshippers in the fishing industry and in attaining business prosperity. The shrine is one of seven dedicated to the Seven Gods of Fortune which make up a pilgrimage route in Hyogo. A grand festival dedicated to Ebisu is held at the shrine from January 9 to 11, attracting many visitors. An Awaji puppet theater performance called the ""Ebisumai"" as well as a tuna offering ceremony are held on January 9 as well."
  • Ninomiya Shrine
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    3.5
    25 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Koubeshi Chuou-ku Ninomiyachou 3-1-12
    "A Shinto shrine located a five-minute walk from the ""Kano-cho 3-Chome"" bus stop and an eight-minute walk from Sannomiya Station. According to records, Empress Jingu stopped to worship at the shrine when she built Ikuta Shrine in 201. The shrine is dedicated to Amenooshihomimi, eldest son of Amaterasu Omikami. The shrine is primarily believed to grant worshippers luck in achieving victory and is known to locals as ""Masakatsu-san."" ""Ninomiya"" means ""Second Shrine,"" and Kobe is dotted with eight similarly named shrines, from Ichinomiya (""First Shrine"") to Hachinomiya (""Eighth Shrine""). Walking the pilgrimage route connecting these eight shrines is said to grant the walker long life, good health, and easy childbearing."

    I was staying in an Airbnb just a couple of blocks away so while everyone else packed, I walked up the street. This is the most peaceful shine Ive visited in Japan and not touristy at all. It feels...

  • Nagata Shrine
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    4.0
    22 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Koubeshi Nagata-ku Nagatachou 3-1-1
    "A Shinto shrine over 1,800 years old located a seven-minute walk from Nagatajinjamae Station and Kosoku Nagata Station as well as right next to the ""Nagatajinjamae"" bus stop. Locals know the shrine as ""Nagata-san."" Dedicated to Kotoshironushi no Kami, a god of happiness, the shrine is believed to grant worshippers improved fortunes and protection from calamity. A red stingray, an avatar of a god, is said to dwell in a sacred camphor tree on the grounds, and even today countless people come here to donate an ema votive tablet decorated with a picture of a red stingray to pray for relief from hemorrhoids. An exciting demon-banishing ceremony held during the Setsubun celebration has been designated a Prefectural Intangible Folk Cultural Property."

    長田駅から商店街を抜けて住宅街に入り数分。長田神社の鳥居が見えてきます。 地元密着の神社にも見えますが、歴史ある官幣中社です。 やや小ぶりの拝殿にお参りしました。境内では人形焼の準備が進められていました。

  • Ohshiko Shrine
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    4.5
    24 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Takasagoshi Amidachou Oshiko 171 National Historic Site Stone Treasure Hall
    "A Shinto shrine located close to the Takasago City Gymnasium in Takasago City, Hyogo Prefecture. The shrine is primarily dedicated to the gods Oanamuji no Mikoto and Sukunabikona no Mikoto. The shrine's stunning Ishi no Hoden is a giant, 6.4 meter wide, 5.7 meter tall, and 7.2 meter long stone shrine which itself is viewed as a shintai, or object housing a god; designed to look as if it were floating on water, it is also known as the ""Floating Stone."" This rock shrine, along with the salt pan of Shiogama-jinja Shrine and the giant halberd of Kirishima-jingu Shrine, is counted as one of the ""Three Shinto Curiosities of Japan"" and is a popular mystical ""power spot."" Each year on the third Saturday and Sunday of October, the shrine holds the Banshu no Aki Festival, and during this time battles are held between portable shrines, crashing them together to show the power of the gods."

    Having seen pictures of this huge stone which appears to float on water, I was pleasantly surprised to find the boulder is part of a serene Shinto shrine up in the hills looking down on the cities...

  • Kashima Shrine
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    4.0
    14 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Takasagoshi Amidachou Jitoku 279
    "A Shinto shrine located a five-minute drive from JR Sone Station on the San'yo Main Line. Dedicated to the gods Futsunushi-no-Kami and Takemikazuchi-no-kami, the shrine is notable for its titanium torii gate, the largest of its kind in Japan and boasting a 1,500-year lifespan. Created in the Myojin torii style in 1998, the gate is a symbol of the shrine. Intone the prayer, ""rokkon shojo nareba negaigoto joju sezaru wa nashi"" (""if I purify the six roots of perception, my wish will be granted""), walk around the main shrine building the number of times equal to their age in years, and their wish will be granted."

    播磨アルプスをバックに見渡せます。 季節の良い時機には、観光も兼ねて訪れるのが良いと思います。 穏やかな雰囲気が流れており、ゆっくりと滞在することができます。

  • Kitayama Kashima Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Takasagoshi Amidachou Kitayama 20
    "A Shinto shrine located at the foot of Mt. Takamikura in Takasago City, Hyogo Prefecture. Established in the early Edo period (1603-1868), the shrine is dedicated to the gods Futsunushi-no-Kami and Takemikazuchi-no-Kami. The shrine is said to grant worshippers traffic safety, the realization of wishes, luck in love and marriage, protection from misfortune, and safe childbirth. Beyond the shrine's white torii gate, the approach to the shrine is lined on both sides with stone lanterns. A local legend speaks of dear that were messengers of the gods, and these dear are worshipped at the shrine as ""Kashima Myojin;"" it is customary for worshippers to take Omikuji fortune slips drawn at the shrine and tie them around a statue of the dear on the grounds."
  • Itsukushima Shrine
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    3.5
    11 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Sumotoshi Honmachi 4-1-27
    "A Shinto shrine located in the center of Sumoto City 10 minutes from the Sumoto interchange on the Kobe-Awaji-Naruto Expressway. Dedicated to the same goddess as Itsukushima Shrine on Miyajima island of Aki (Hiroshima)-Ichikishimahime-no-Mikoto. During the period when the syncretism of Buddhism and Shintoism flourished in Japan, this goddess was seen as another aspect of Benzaiten, and as such the shrine is also known as the ""Awaji Island Benzaiten."" Known to locals as ""Benten-san,"" during the shrine's fall festival, called the Benzaiten Festival, festival stalls open up all along the surrounding streets, and the area bustles with visitors. The ""Goshinko"" deity transference ceremony conducted on the final day of the festival is considered one of Japan's top ""unusual"" festival rituals."

    弁財天と習合されたいちきしまひめのみことを祀っております。創建年代は、江戸時代の前半と伝えられております。

  • Izumo Taisha Kobe Bunshi Shrine
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    3.5
    2 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Koubeshi Chuou-ku Kusunokichou 1-2-1
    "A five-minute walk from Kobe Rapid Transit Railway Nishi-Motomachi Station. This Shinto shrine, standing in a corner on the grounds of a building in downtown Kobe, is dedicated to a portion of the god Okuninonushi ritually transferred here from the Izumo Taisha Grand Shrine in Shimane Prefecture. The shrine was established in 1895 by a Kobe religious group and is known to some as the ""Kobe Izumo-san."" Like Shimane's Izumo Taisha Grand Shrine, this shrine is believed to grant worshippers luck in finding love and marriage; it is also believed to grant good fortune and to have authority over the afterlife. Just like the Izumo Taisha Grand Shrine, visitors worship at the shrine by bowing twice, then clapping four times, and finally bowing once more before making their prayer."

    ビルの間にすっぽり入ったように本殿があります。出雲大社の分詞なので縁結びにご利益があるそうです。小さいですが静かでよい神社です。

  • Yuzuruha Shrine
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    4.0
    60 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Koubeshi Higashinada-ku Mikagegunge 2-9-27
    Located about a five-minute walk southeast from the Hankyu Kobe Line's Mikage Station, many visitors come to this Shinto shrine with its symbol of a mythical raven to pray for victory. The shrine has deep ties to Japanese soccer, as Japan's first soccer team hails from Mikage. The shrine shares its raven symbol with the Japan Football Association, and there's even a granite soccer ball statue installed beside the main hall. The figure skater Yuzuru Hanyu has come here to pray before competitions, so it's become a sort of sacred spot for his fans and those who want to cheer him on.

    Yuzuruha Shrine has changed, or at least is changing, its character. It used to be a sacred place for soccer fans because of its sacred messenger animal, a three-legged crow, which Japan Football...

  • Wada Shrine
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    4.0
    3 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Koubeshi Hyougo-ku Wadamiyadori 3-2-45
    A Shinto shrine located a two-minute walk north of the Exit 2 of Wadamisaki Station on the Kaigan Line in Kobe City, Hyogo Prefecture. The shrine is dedicated to Amenominakanushi no Okami, Hiruko no Okami, and Ichikishima-hime no Okami. The shrine has a hall where shogun Tokugawa Iemochi and statesman Katsu Kaishu at lunch together and where poet Yosa Buson held haiku gatherings. There's also the stately main shrine building, a mound of snake figurines, a stone monument to Koda Hyoemon, and a doll mound where dolls are ritually burned. The shrine's Danjiri portable festival shrine, restored in 1980, also participates in the Kobe Festival and has become famous.

    赤い大きな鳥居を潜ると一面駐車場です。もし車がない時代なら自然豊かな参道があったのでないかと想像してしまいました。それでも社務社や拝殿近辺はいくつもの摂社や自然や埴輪まであります。ふと松の下を見ると沢山の小さな白蛇がとぐろまいています。ここ和田神社は白蛇が神様のお使いのようですね。地元の寺社仏閣を巡る七福神コースというものがありここは辨財天を祀っているようです。

  • Arima Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Koubeshi Kita-ku Arinochou Arino 4435
    You can reach this Shinto shrine in Kobe City, Hyogo Prefecture in a ten-minute walk from Okaba Station on Kobe Electric Railway's Sanda Line. The shrine's commonly called Sanno San, and it's thought worshiping here will protect children. The gods it honors include Onamuchi-no-Okami and Sukunahikona-no-Okami. It's date of founding is unknown. The sub-shrine known as Kubonomori-sha honors Amaterasu-Okami, the sun goddess. There's also Sarutahiko-sha, a sub-shrine honoring the god Sarutahiko Okami, and a sacred stone visited to pray for safe childbirth. They hold functions including a summer purification ceremony and the Nakizumo Crying Baby Sumo Festival, and they accept items like stuffed animals, dolls, and knapsacks for ceremonial burning.
  • Koshien Susanoo-jinja Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Nishinomiyashi Koushienchou 2-40
    This Shinto shrine is right next to Koshien Stadium in Nishinomiya City, Hyogo Prefecture. Its age is unknown, but it was rebuilt repeatedly from the late 17th through the mid-19th century, and there's ample evidence of the respect it's earned from the locals. Today, as it's next door to a ballpark, it has a stone monument dedicated to baseball, a ball shaped monument, paving stones shaped like home plate, and other signs of the sport. They sell Hanshin Tigers themed amulets and ema votive plaques, and so many visitors come to pray for their team's victory that it's also called Koshien Shrine and Tigers Shrine.
  • Koshikiiwa-jinja Shrine
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    4.5
    27 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Nishinomiyashi Koshikiwachou 5-4
    "This Shinto shrine is in a grove that's a Natural Monument. It's about a 15-minute walk from Koyoen Station on the Hankyu Koyo Line in Nishinomiya City, Hyogo Prefecture. Rebuilt in the 1640s, it honors the deity Hiruko Okami, also known as ""Ebessan."" It has historic spots of interest like a haiku monument to the Muromachi period poet Yamazaki Sokan and leftover stones from Osaka Castle. They hold a Nakizumo Crying Baby and Sumo Festival every autumn, a traditional event where babies wearing ornamental sumo aprons are brought into the ring. The event has even been recorded in ema votive pictures dating from 1831."

    This is your normal local shrine. It is well kept and has a great relaxing cool atmosphere about it. A walk up there from Hankyu Kurakoen station is nice and you have good hiking trails further on...

  • Hirota-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    72 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Nishinomiyashi Taishachou 7-7
    Written about in the Nihon Shoki, this is Hyogo Prefecture's oldest shrine. You can reach it by taking a Hankyu or Hanshin bus to the Hirota Jinja Mae stop. There's a view of Mt. Rokko to the rear of the shrine with its legend of Empress Jingu and you can see from Nishinomiya's townscape to Omaehama Beach and Osaka Bay from the front. Besides daily rituals, they hold the Tsuki Hajime Sai and Hatsu Hoko Sai on the 1st of every month, the Tsukinami no Matsuri on the 16th, as well as various events throughout the year that attract visitors from all over Japan. The shrine's kobanomitsuba azaleas have been designated a Prefectural Natural Monument, and they hold an Azalea Festival in April.

    this shrine is one of the nearest from my home. I sometimes visit here with my dog. This shrine has long long history from 8 century. You can experience calm mind in front of the main building.

  • Ako Oishi-jinja Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Akoushi Kamikariya 131-7
    Oishi-jinja Shrine is dedicated to Oishi Yoshio (Kuranosuke) and the 47 Ronin (masterless samurai) from the Chushingura literature. As the 47 Ronin endured a difficult 22-month period, it's thought worshiping here will make one's greatest wish come true. It's on the north side of the Ako Castle Ruins. The shrine's Gishi Treasure House and Gishi Museum have displays of Kuranosuke's swords as well as items connected to the 47 Ronin. It's a great chance to learn more about Ako Gishi, another name for the 47 Ronin. The Ako Gishi Festival is held on December 14 every year to commemorate the 47 Ronin's raid on the Kira Residence. It's a lively event with crowds and parades through downtown Ako, as well as lantern stands lit in honor of the Ronin along the way to the shrine.
  • Tada Shrine
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    4.0
    43 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Kawanishishi Tadaintadadokorochou 1-1
    This historic Shinto shrine founded in 970 has ties to Seiwa-Genji. One of the Three Genji Shrines, it honors Minamoto no Mitsunaka and has been designated a National Historic Site because of its pedigree. The shrine's treasure house holds the Minamoto Clan's Onikiri-maru sword, as well as armor and ancient documents. The grounds also feature rare camellia varieties like Camellia reticulata and Camellia japonica that are a sight to behold when in bloom. Visitors pack in for April's Genji Festival featuring a parade of samurai and other historical figures connected to the Genji clan in period dress, such as Tomoe Gozen and Shizuka Gozen. You can reach the shrine by walking west from Tada Station on the Nose Electric Railway's Myoken Line for about 15 minutes.

    This is an important shrine where the key ancestors of the Minamoto clan have been enshrined since the 10th century. In Japan, there are two major samurai clans; they are the Taira clan and the...

  • Togakushi Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Hyougo Pref. Kawabeguninagawachou Kimokawa Nishinomae 136
    "This small Shinto shrine is located in the residential area of Tsutsujigaoka west of the Shinmei Expressway's Kawanishi Interchange. Honoring the deity Amenotajikarao-no-mikoto, the main shrine is a National Important Cultural Property. It's well preserved and still has some of its original frog-leg struts called ""Kaerumata"". The shrine's date of origin is unknown, but it's been worshiped as the guardian sanctuary of Kimokawa since ancient times and has legends connecting it to Shinto mythology. A large fir tree on the precincts is said to be the fifth largest in Hyogo Prefecture. The area around the shrine is covered with cedar trees, giving it a refined atmosphere."

Hyogo Areas

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Hyogo prefecture stretches from the north coast to the south coast on the western end of the popular Kansai region, encompassing verdant mountains, urban beaches, and fantastic historical sights. The prefecture's main attractions lie along the south coast at Kobe, the prefectural capital, a pretty harbor city best known for its production of the renowned Kobe beef, and Himeji, the home of Himeji Castle, one of the country's most beautifully preserved feudal castles, perched magically atop a hill.

Hyogo Photo Album

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