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Temple Spots in Kurama / Kibune / Ohara Area

  • Rokuon-ji Temple (Kinkaku-ji Temple)
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    4.5
    16820 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Kita-ku Kinkakujichou 1
    This temple began when third generation shogun of the Muromachi shogunate Ashikaga Yoshimitsu inherited the Saionji family's mountain villa and called the villa “Kitayamadono.” After his death it was changed into a Zen temple named “Rokuonji.” The reliquary hall is a three-story building shining beautifully in gold and looks pretty reflected in the Kyokoike (mirror pond). This brilliant architecture was a symbol of Kitayama culture but burned down in a 1950 fire, then was rebuilt in 1955. In 1994 it was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

    We arrived around 4p on Christmas Day with no lines or crowds. The Golden Temple was stunning and its reflected image on the water along with the landscape is breathtakingly beautiful. Whatever...

  • Kitano Tenmangu Shrine
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    4.5
    29 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Kamigyou-ku Bakurochou
    Popularly known as “Kitano no Tenjin-san,” this Shinto shrine is located in Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto City. The shrine was founded in 947. It is also the head shrine of all 12 thousand Tenmangu and Tenjin shrines throughout the country dedicated to Sugawara no Michizane, the god of scholarship. The shrine is frequented by students and test-takers not only during entrance exam season in winter but throughout the year. The main shrine, erected in 1607, is a National Treasure and a magnificent example of Momoyama architecture. Famed for its Japanese apricot blossoms, a gorgeous open air tea ceremony is performed by Kamishichiken geisha at the shrine during the Plum Blossom Festival on February 25. The shrine also bustles with numerous street stalls and people during the Tenjin Market, opened every month on the 25th.

    It was actually pouring down rain the day we went to this flea market but we still had a great time. There were tons of booths with lots of interesting and different things to purchase at a...

  • Jisho-ji Temple (Ginkaku-ji Temple)
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    4.5
    4566 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Ginkakujichou 2
    A mountain retreat modeled after the Kinkaku-ji Temple (Gold Pavillion Temple) built by Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, grandfather of the eighth Muromachi shogun Ashikaga Yoshimasa, in 1482. After Yoshimasa’s death, the villa was turned into a Rinzai Shokoku-ji school Zen Buddhist temple and, based on Yoshimasa’s posthumous name, the temple was named the Jishoji Temple. The Kannon Hall, commonly known as the Ginkaku (Silver Pavillion), is simple and elegant in its design; the Togu-do hall is the oldest extant example of ancient Japanese shoin-zukuri architecture and is designated a National Treasure.

    We arrived when the temple opened at 8.30am. This meant we avoided tour groups and the place truly felt special and magical. We were there during Autumn so the leaves were stunning. Stones raked in...

  • Nanzen-ji Zen Temple
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    4.5
    2140 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Nanzenjifukuchichou
    The head temple of the Rinzai school of Zen Buddhism, located in Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City. The temple was founded by the priest Mukan Fumon as the Zenrin-ji-dono, the imperial villa of Emperor Kameyama in 1291. The temple’s standing is high; it is considered above the five most important Rinzai temples in both Kyoto and Kamakura. Its triple gate is considered one of the three most impressive temple gates in Kyoto and is also famous as the setting of a scene in the kabuki play Sanmon gosan no kiri, in which the character of Ichikawa Goemon utters the well-known line, “How beautiful, how beautiful!” The temple houses numerous Important Cultural Properties, such as famed painter Kano Tan’yu’s screen paining The Tiger of Mizunomi. The grounds contain an abbot’s residence which is a National Treasure and was moved here from the former imperial palace of Fushimi Castle. The temple’s garden is a dry landscape garden representative of the early Edo period style.

    This is quite a plain temple, but the sheer size of the gigantic gate makes it worth a visit just in itself! There is also the curious feature of a European-style aquaduct just off to one side, which...

  • Daitokuji Temple
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Kita-ku Murasakinodaitokujichou 53
    Daitokuji Temple was opened in 1315, and is the head temple of the Rinzai school of Zen Buddhism’s Daitokuji faction. There are two branch temples in the expansive grounds, along with 22 sub temples and an array of National Treasures and Important Cultural Properties. Though destroyed during the Onin War, it is famous for having been restored by high monk Ikkyu. There is also a wooden image of Sen no Rikyu enshrined at the spot he repaired on the second floor of the main temple gate, and it is said that Hideyoshi’s fury at this is one of the reason’s he committed suicide.
  • Sanzen-in Monzeki (Sanzen-in Temple)
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    4.5
    800 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Ohararaikouinchou 540
    This Buddhist temple’s origin dates back to the Enryaku period (782–806), when the priest Saicho opened a temple in the To-do on Mt. Hiei; the temple moved to its current location in 1871. The temple grounds are filled with historic buildings, including the Ojo Gokuraku-in Hall and reception halls for Imperial and regular guests. The Amida Hall on the south side of the grounds houses a figure of Amitabha flanked by two attendants, a National Treasure. There are numerous other highlights, including the beautiful moss-covered Shuheki-en and Yusei-en gardens. Seasonal flowers and natural beauty can be enjoyed on the temple’s grounds year round, as well, including cherry blossoms in the spring and fall foliage in autumn.

    We loved the garden around Sanzen-in Temple. Beautiful water features. Moss gardens and stone statues were outstanding. So much to photograph... There were restaurants and stores leading up to the...

  • Kurama-dera Temple
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    4.5
    373 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Kuramahonchou 1074
    A Buddhist temple whose origin dates back to 770 when Gantei (Jiàn zhēng) shonin, the leading disciple of the Chinese priest Ganjin (Jiàn zhēn) wajyo, enshrined a statue of Bishamonten (Vaisravana: the guardian god of Buddhism) here. Thereafter, in 796, Chief of Temple Construction Fujiwara no Isendo had an additional temple building constructed here enshrining a figure of Senju Kannon (Thousand-armed Buddhist Goddess of Mercy). The temple is known for its legends regarding a tengu (long-nosed goblin) and Ushiwakamaru (young Minamoto no Yoshitsune), and there are sites along the mountain trail leading to the inner sanctuary from behind the main temple building connected to him. The “path of 99 bends,” which famed author and court lady Sei Shonagon described as being “short yet long” in her Pillow Book, extends for approximately one kilometer between the main temple gate and the main temple building, but visitors may also ride a cable car up to the temple’s two tier pagoda. A renowned “power spot,” this popular site is visited by great numbers of people each year.

    Kifune and Kurama is easily accesible from Kyoto station, remember eizan line because this is your gateway to both place.You could use google map or hyperdia for how to get there. I used my kansai...

  • Reikanji Temple
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Shishigatanigoshonodanchou 12
    This temple is in Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City. Built in 1654, it is of the Nanzenji branch of the Rinzai Sect of Buddhism. Housing over 200 goshoningyo, (palace dolls), and other treasures, its collection rivals that of the imperial household. There is a Japanese style pond garden on the premises where visitors enjoy the camellias and autumn foliage. During most of the year the temple is not open to the public, but in the spring and autumn peak viewing seasons, it is opened for a special period. Photo: special spring and autumn viewing times.
  • Nanzen-ji Zen Temple Tenjuan
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Nanzenjifukuchichou
    A sub temple of the Nanzen-ji Zen Temple located in Sakyo Ward in Kyoto City. The temple was built by imperial charter from Emperor Kogon in 1339 as the private hermitage of Mukan Fumon, the priest who founded the Nanzen-ji Zen Temple. Visitors can enjoy two Japanese gardens—a strolling garden built around a central pond thick with trees, and a landscape garden composed of white sand and rhomboidal stones. The fall foliage is gorgeous and the view from the main temple nave is truly superb. The abbot’s chamber is decorated with a screen painting by the famed Hasegawa Tohaku which is a registered Important Cultural Property; unfortunately, however, it is not displayed to the general public.
  • Konchi-in
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    4.5
    105 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Nanzenjifukuchichou
    A sub temple of the Nanzen-ji Zen Temple located in Sakyo Ward in Kyoto City. The temple is said to have been erected in Kitayama by Ashikaga Yoshimochi, the fourth Muromachi shogun, and moved to its current location in 1605. Toshogu Shrine, erected according to the will of the great shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu, serves as the temple’s richly decorated main hall. The front hall is famous for paintings such as the Crying Dragon ceiling painting by Kano Tan’yu and the Thirty-Six Great Poets by Tosa Mitsuoki. An Important Cultural Property, the Toshogu Shrine also enshrines a lock of Ieyasu’s hair and his personal image of the Buddha. The main temple nave is famous for its gold wall paintings created in the Kano school style. The grounds offer numerous points of note, such as a tea room deemed on the of three best in Kyoto, as well as the Crane and Tortoise Garden, a designated Place of Scenic Beauty.

    We happened upon this temple walking back to the subway from Nanzen-ji and decided to stop because it cost only about 400¥ each to get in. It looked peaceful and something was drawing us here. You...

  • Eikando Zenrin-ji
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    4.5
    1674 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Eikandouchou 48
    The head temple of Nishiyama Zenrinji Pure Land Sect of Buddhism, located in Eikando Town, Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City. The temple was erected by Shinsho, a disciple of the famed priest Kukai, in 853 to serve as a Pure Land Sect dojo. Thereafter, a man named Eikan joined the priesthood and began engaging in philanthropic works while spreading Pure Land Buddhism and encouraging people to pray to Amitabha. Accordingly, the name “Eikando” is derived from his name. The temple is famous for its standing figure of Amitabha, which is looking back over its shoulder. An exhibit of the temple’s treasure house is held in November. The temple has also been famous for its autumn foliage since ancient times.

    It is close to Nanzen-ji Temple. You can get there by foot. The temple is smaller than Nanzen-ji Temple but its beauty is also good. We spent more time in there to explore it all. In addition, they...

  • Jakkoin Temple
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    4.0
    132 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Oharakusaochou 676
    This temple is in Ohara, Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City, and is famous for its ties to the Tale of the Heike Legend. Exact details of the temple's establishment are unknown but it is said to have been constructed by Shotoku Taishi in 594 to ensure his father's, Emperor Youmei's, happiness in the next life. Taira no Tokuko, also Kenreimon-in, daughter of Taira no Kiyomori, wife of Emperor Takakura and mother of Emperor Antoku, survived her drowning suicide attempt at the battle of Dan-no-Ura. Afterwards she became a nun secluded within the temple to pray for the happiness of her son and Tira clan in the next life. On the grounds are a pond and cherry trees associated with visits from Cloistered Emperor Goshirakawa and the Tale of the Heike and the changing autumn colors provide beautiful scenery.

    haunting reminder of the transience of life. beautiful place:again like Gioji, best experienced in solitude.

  • Shinshogokuraku-ji Temple (Shin’nyo-do)
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    4.5
    199 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Joudojishinnyochou 82
    This Buddhist temple located in Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City is commonly called the Shin’nyo-do. The temple was founded in 984 when the priest Kaisan enshrined a figure of Amitabha from the Jyogyo-do Hall on Mt. Hiei. This figure, called the “Nodding Amitabha,” is said to provide aid to women. The current temple hall was erected in the mid-Edo period (1693–1717). The grounds carry an atmosphere befitting a major temple and are home to the massive main hall (an Important Cultural Property) and a beautiful three–story pagoda. The temple is also fast becoming a popular spot to view the scarlet maple leaves and bustles with visitors in fall.

    Shinnyodo Temple was a smaller temple along Philosophers Path. The atmosphere around was peaceful and quiet than other tourists spots in the area but also with fall colors in the garden of the...

  • Zuiganzan Enkouji Temple
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Ichijoujikotanichou 13
    A Rinzai Nanzen-ji Buddhist temple located in the Ichijo-ji area of Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City. The temple was erected in 1601 by Sanyo Genkitsu (Kanshitsu), Zen priest and ninth head of the Ashikaga Gakko school, who was asked to do so by Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu to promote education and learning in the nation. The beauty of the temple’s garden, a traditional strolling garden built around a central pond, is said to have been much praised by ancient people, and is still a must-see today. The garden is filled with sights, including a traditional Suikinkutsu (ceramic pot under the ground) said to purify the soul with the clear sound of the water dripping into it; “Honryutei,” a dry landscape garden; and the “Jyu-gyu no niwa” Garden, famed for its moss and autumn foliage. The temple was also the site where the Fushimi-ban, one of Japan’s first printed books, was created, and the roughly 50 thousand wooden printing type used to make the book kept at the temple are designated an Important Cultural Property as Japan’s oldest printed type.
  • Manshuin Temple (Takenouchi Monzeki )
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Ichijoujitakenouchichou 42
    A Tendai Buddhist temple located in the Ichijo-ji area of Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City. Founded by the priest Zesan, the temple’s principle object of worship is a figure of Amitabha. The Manshu-in Temple is a monzeki temple (a temple once ran by a priest of noble lineage) and is also called the Takenouchi Monzeki Temple. Together with the Shoren-in, Sanzen-in Temple (Kaiji Monzeki Temple), Myoho-in Temple, and Bishamon-do Monzeki Temple, it is one of the five Tendai monzeki temples. The temple’s richly colored image of Acala and copy of the ancient Kokin Wakashu poetry anthology are designated National Treasures. Its large and small studies are designated Important Cultural Properties. The dry landscape garden (a Place of Scenic Beauty) which extends in front of the studies is said to have been created by Kobori Enshu and is particularly beautiful in May when the Kirishima azaleas come in bloom, as well as in November when the autumn foliage is at its peak.
  • Shisen-do Jozanji Temple
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    4.5
    237 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Ichijoujimonguchichou 27
    Located in Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City, this was once the site of a mountain villa built by Edo period literati Ishikawa Jozan for his retirement. It is a nationally designated Historic Site. Today, it is a Soto Buddhist temple that is also called the Jozan-ji. Jozan had the Shisen-do built at the age of 59. For the remaining 30 some years of his life, this great man of letters devoted his time to poetry, calligraphy, and gardening, to the exclusion of even sleeping and eating. The Shisen-do preserves a great number of his works and calligraphy and, in addition to a standing exhibition, the temple a special three day exhibition starting from May 23 each year, the anniversary of Jozan’s death. The temple’s garden was designed by Jozan himself, a renowned gardener, and is particularly famous for its satsuki azaleas in spring and fall foliage in autumn. It is said that the first shishi-odoshi was created here. The shishi-odoshi is a bamboo tube balanced on a pivot which slowly fills with water until it tips over, draining the water and falling back into position with a “plonk” noise. Shishi-odoshi are practical – their sound scares away deer and wild boars that might eat garden plants – but their sound also accentuates the silence of a garden, and it is said Jozan loved the sound they made.

    We were lucky enough to be in Kyoto for the autumn leaves, so chose our sight seeing around this theme. We had come to Enkoji, the temple next door which is also fantastic and a must see, and...

  • Genkoan
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    4.5
    173 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Kita-ku Takagaminekitatakagaminechou 47
    A Soto school Buddhist temple located in the Takagamine area of Kita Ward, Kyoto City. The temple was founded in 1346 by the priest Tetto. The temple’s “Window of Bewilderment” and “Window of Enlightenment” are frequently presented in television programs and guidebooks. It is said that one will gain insights and be led further towards enlightenment by first gazing at the temple garden through the square Window of Bewilderment, representative of human life, and re-examining one’s life so far, then gazing through the round Window of Enlightenment, which expresses a Zen state of mind and represents the cosmos. The temple is also famous for the main hall’s “Bloody Ceiling,” which was once the floor of Fushimi Castle and vividly portrays the tragedy of the castle’s fall.

    I visited Genkoan in November 2016. It was allowed to take photos everywhere in the temple, including photos of the famous windows. Personnel working there are treating visitors kindly. On Nov.17th...

  • Hosen-in Temple
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    4.5
    186 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Oharashourininchou 187
    A Buddhist temple located in Oharashorinin-cho, Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City. One of the three Tendai Monzeki temples, it stands on the road approaching the Sanzen-in Temple. The temple’s beautiful “framed garden” is powerful and lush, with a 300 year old sal tree and a 700 year old Japanese white pine which has been designated a Natural Monument by the city of Kyoto. Visitors can pass through a tatami room with a view of the white pine and exchange a ticket provided at the grounds entrance to receive a cup of matcha green tea and an original temple confection.

    Enjoyed szopping here...... nice and a bit off the beaten tracck with few visitors and a rather comparable small size

  • Toji-in Temple
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    4.0
    98 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Kita-ku Toujinkitamachi 63
    A Rinzai Tenryu-ji Buddhist temple located in Kita Ward, Kyoto City. The family temple of the Ashikaga clan, it is also famous for being the grave site of Ashikaga Takauji. The temple garden was created when it was first founded by Muso Kokushi (Soseki), famous as the designer of the gardens at the Tenryu-ji Temple and Saiho-ji Temple (commonly called Koke-dera, Moss Temple). The garden is actually comprised of two separate, differing gardens built around two ponds in the east and west—a dry landscape garden and a traditional circular strolling garden. The western garden is particularly well known for its numerous sights, including the pond created in the shape of a cotton rose blossom, its tea room, and the wooden figures of Ashikaga generals enshrined in the Reikoden hall.

    The visit to tgis temple is short and since is close to the station it can be done with a few minutes walk. There are some beatufull statues inside the two main buldings and a nice pagoda outside...

  • Kurodani,  Konkai-Komyoji Temple
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    4.0
    164 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Kurodanichou 121
    A Jyodo Buddhist temple located in the Kurodani-cho area of Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City. The temple is popularly known as Kurodani-san. It is also one of the seven head temples of the Jyodo sect and one of the four located in Kyoto. The temple is comprised of 18 sub temple buildings in addition to primary buildings such as the Amitabha Hall, Miei-do Hall, and three-story pagoda. The pagoda, a designated Important Cultural Property, was built in 1634 to memorialize Tokugawa Hidetada. The grounds also host a memorial pillar of the third shogun Tokugawa Iemitsu’s mother, Ogoh erected by Iemitsu’s wet nurse Lady Kasuga. Highlights include temple treasures such as the Image of Amitabha Crossing the Mountains and Image of Hell and the Pure Land, Important Cultural Properties, as well as a wooden figure of the thousand armed Kannon.

    This seems to hold importance to the locals and had many people visiting, just not tourists. Very nice and interesting grounds, there is ample parking though far from full when I was there. A short...

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