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Shrine Spots in Kyoto Area

  • Fushimi Inari Taisha
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Fushimi-ku Fukakusa Yabunouchi cho 68
    This shrine in Fushimi Ward, Kyoto City, is the head of all Inari Shrines in Japan, which total to around 30,000 shrines. The shrine is particularly famous for its vermillion lacquered Torii gate tunnels, as well as to parishioners visiting the god for business, harvest, and fortune. Many of the buildings on the grounds are also painted with brilliant vermillion lacquer including the front shrine, main shrine, and tower gate, which has been designated an Important Cultural Properties of Japan. The torii gate corridor, said to consist of several thousand to 10,000 torii gates, twists and turns making it quite the spectacle. Beyond that is the rear shrine as well as the entrance to Mt. Inari-san which is dotted with countless small burial mounds. It is one of the most famous spots in the Kansai region to visit for the annual New Year Shrine Visit and draws huge numbers of visitors every year.
  • Kifune-jinja Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Kuramakibunechou 180
    This shrine in Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City, is the head shrine for the Kifune-Shrines in Japan which number almost 500 shrines. Long been known for the god of rain it has also gained faith from the chefs, cooking industry, and water industries of Japan. Therefore, unlike the regional name of Kibune, the name of the shrine is read as Kifune. The middle shrine located between the main shrine and the rear shrine enshrines the goddess Iwanaga-hime, a goddess of marriage and matchmaking, and is therefore popular amongst young couples.
  • Shimogamo-jinja Shrine
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    4.5
    922 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Shimogamoizumigawachou 59
    Formally titled the Kamomioya Shrine, this historic Shinto shrine is one of Kyoto’s oldest. The entire grounds of the shrine are registered as part of the “Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto” World Heritage listing. Dedicated to the guardian deity of Kyoto as well as the guardian deity of woman’s duties, since ancient times the shrine has been seen as providing divine aid in receiving guidance, achieving victory, and starting new projects. The grounds are also dotted with women-oriented shrines and sites, such as the Aioi-sha, a shrine dedicated to luck in marriage, and Kawai Shrine, a guardian shrine for women.

    Most won't visit these lesser traveled shrines in Kyoto sticking to the tourist-packed icons in Higashi-yama or Arashiyama. This is a beautiful shrine in beautiful park that enshrines it.

  • Heian Jingu Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Okazakinishitennouchou
    A Shinto shrine located in Sakyo Ward in Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture which was erected in 1895 to commemorate the 1,100th anniversary of the foundation of the ancient capital of Heian-Kyo. The shrine is dedicated to Emperor Kammu and Emperor Komei. The main shrine building is a 5/8th scale replica of the Heian-Kyo government reception hall used during the time of Emperor Kammu. The shrine’s solemn vermillion lacquered buildings roofed with green glazed tiles and the white gravel covering the grounds are a spectacle to behold. The surrounding Japanese garden is strolling garden built around a central pond which is divided into four separate sections filled with splendid flowering plants and trees appropriate to the four seasons. The shrine is also famous for its weeping cherry trees in spring.
  • Kamo-wake ikazuchi Jinja (Kamigamo-jinja Shrine)
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Kita-ku Kamigamomotoyama 339
    This shrine in Kita Ward, Kyoto City, enshrines the patron god of the Kamo clan. It is said the shrine was founded in 678 when the god Kamowakeikazuchi no Okami descended to the foot of Mt. Kamosan during the reign of Emperor Jimmu. The god is said to protect against misfortune, grant good fortune, victory in battle, and protect the power industry. The main hall and temporary shrine are both National Treasures and were last rebuilt in 1863 while the 34 worship halls rebuilt in 1628 are designated Important Cultural Properties of Japan. On May 15th they hold the Aoi Festival, one of Kyoto's three largest festivals, and many people come to watch the procession which is put on in Heian-period costumes.
  • Yasui Konpiragu Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Higashiyama-ku Shimobentenchou 70
    A Shinto shrine located in Higashiyama Ward, Kyoto City popularly known as Yasui no Konpira-san. Fujiwara no Kamatari established the shrine during the reign of Emperor Tenchi. He planted purple wisterias and named it Fuji-dera (the Temple of Wisteria) in prayer for the prosperity of his clan and the perpetuation of his descendants. The shrine is principally dedicated to Emperor Sutoku, who excised all desire from himself and became a monk in the Konpiragu in the former Sanuki Province; accordingly, the temple has attracted faithful seeking to excise all bad attachments and make good ones since ancient times. It is believed that spouses and couples who have a good relationship and come here will not see their relationships ended but rather find them growing deeper.
  • Seimei-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    287 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Prefecture Kyoto-shi, Kamigyo-ku Horikawa Tsushin Ichijo Le Rui Mihacho 806
    This is a Shinto shrine dedicated to Abe no Seimei, a diviner active in the mid Heian period, built in 1007 by Emperor Ichijo in order to appease the diviner’s spirit. The shrine helps ward off evil and danger, and many visitors come to escape misfortune. The shrine has a distinct Onmyodo mystical atmosphere, from the pentagrams depicted on the tori gate, paper lanterns and votive pictures to the diviner stone statues.

    This shrine was established in 11th century for Japan's legendary figure, Abe no Seimei, who was said to be an 'onmyoji' who practiced Japanese yin and yang (onmyo) - a system of divination...

  • Imamiya-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    177 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Kita-ku Murasakinoimamiyachou 21
    A Shinto shrine located in Kita Ward, Kyoto City distinguished by its vivid red lacquering. The shrine is also called Tamanokoshi-jinja (the Shrine of the Jeweled Palanquin). The shrine was established to alleviate infectious disease and disasters in downtown Kyoto during the Heian period, and the shrine attracts faithful seeking sound health and long life. Venerable shops selling aburi mochi rice cakes stand in front of the shrine’s East Gate, and it is said eating these wards away disease and evil. The Yasurai Festival, held since the shrine’s founding to ward away infectious disease, is officially designated a national Important Intangible Folk-Cultural Property as the Yasurai-bana, and is held each year on the second Sunday of April.

    Imamiya Shrine is a hidden gem in Kyoto. I went here after going to nearby Koetsuji, and both sites were not crowded with tourists.

  • Kenkun-jinja Shrine
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    3.5
    28 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Kita-ku Murasakinokitafunaokachou 49
    This is a Shinto shrine dedicated to Oda Nobunaga, erected in 1869 by Emperor Meiji. On October 19th each year the Funaoka Taisai festival is held to commemorate Nobunaga’s entry to Kyoto, with offerings of Atsumori dancing and music. Since the shrine is on a small hill, it overlooks the beautiful scenery of Mt. Hiei and Mt. Daimonji. It also houses Important Cultural Assets including the Yoshimoto Samonji sword and the Shincho Koki (Biography of Oda Nobunaga).

    9月の台風のせいでしょうか一部通行が出来なくなっています。織田信長公を祀る為明治になって創建された神社です。応仁の乱後荒廃した京都を復興し町民の産業振興を行った織田信長公なので明治期には改めて評価されたようです。拝殿に行くには結構階段を上りますが市内を見渡すことが出来ます。

  • Iwashimizu-Hachimangu Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Yawatashi Yawata Takabou 30
    Considered one of the greatest Hachiman shrines, Shinto shrines dedicated to Hachiman, in the country, this shrine was established in 859 when the deity of Usa Hachimangu in Kyushu was ceremonially divided and transferred here to protect an Imperial castle built in southwestern Heian-kyo (the former name of the city of Kyoto), considered an unlucky area due to the tenets of feng shui. Today, believers come to the shrine for protection from evil and calamity, and has come to be affectionately known as “Yawata no Hachiman-sama.” The Shrine’s vermillion-lacquered main building was rebuilt with donations from Tokugawa Iemitsu in the Edo period, and it, together with structures such as the inner shrine, outer shrine, two tier gate, are all registered as Important Cultural Property.
  • Kurumazaki-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    97 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Ukyou-ku Sagasahichou 23
    A Shinto shrine located in the Saga area of Ukyo Ward, Kyoto City dedicated to Kiyohara no Yorinari, a Confucian scholar who lived in the late Heian period. Kiyohara no Yorinari is seen as a god of luck with money, prosperous business, luck in finding marriage, and the warding away of evil. The shrine has a custom whereby visitors can purchase a stone from the shrine office and make a wish; the shrine piles the stones of successful wish-makers in front of the main shrine. The grounds also contain a shrine dedicated to Ame no Uzume, the goddess of performing arts, which is famous for the many performers and entertainers who come to visit it. On the third Sunday of May, the shrine holds the Three Boats Festival on the Oi River on Mt. Arashi, an event which recreates the boating the nobility would engage in during the Heian period.

    I had chance to visit this shrine during Mantosai Festival (middle of Audust), and lanterns were really beautiful. You can also buy it for 500 yen and hang it by yourself.

  • Goou Jinja Shinto Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto-shi, Kyoto Kamigyo-ku Karasuma communication under Chojamachi Shitaru Okakuen-cho 385
    This Shinto shrine located in Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto City is primarily dedicated to Wake no Kiyomaro, who contributed to the construction of the ancient capital of Heian-Kyo. Kiyomaro’s older sister Wake no Hiromushi, is famous for having worked to aid orphans and is considered a god associated with child rearing. Based on the legend of Wake no Kiyomaro being saved from an assassin by the sudden appearance of 300 wild boar (inoshishi) on his way to exile in Usa, the shrine is protected by statues of boar in place of traditional lion-dogs and accordingly is nicknamed the “Inoshishi Jinja (Wild Boar Shrine).”
  • Higashi Tennou Okazaki-jinja Shrine
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    3.5
    94 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Okazakihigashitennouchou 51
    This is one of the Shinto shrines built under imperial orders of Emperor Kanmu to protect the imperial palace during the relocation of the capital, Heiankyo, in 794. The enshrined deities Susano-no-Mikoto and Kushinada-Hime-no-Mikoto were blessed with many children, so many believers visit the shrine to pray for conception and safe child delivery.  Since there are wild rabbits inhabiting the land around the shrine, it is said that the messenger of the enshrined deity is also a rabbit and there are cute images of rabbits all around including child conception rabbits, guardian rabbits and beckoning rabbits.

    Quirky small rabbit temple that’s actually a hidden gem - worth a look if nearby. Shrine has rabbit theme everywhere! Cool place.

  • Nonomiya-jinja Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Ukyou-ku Saganonomiyachou 1
    A Shinto shrine located in the Sagano area of Ukyo Ward, Kyoto City. The shrine is dedicated to gods of scholarship, love, children, and easy childbirth, and is particularly renowned for aiding in finding marriage. The shrine was the setting of the Sakaki chapter of the famed Tale of Genji and is also the subject of the classic Noh song Nonomiya; the grounds contain numerous informational signs noting key points mentioned in these works. It is said that if one rubs the Kame-ishi (Tortoise Stone) next to the shrine dedicated to the marriage god Nonomiya Daikokuten, one’s wish will be granted within the year, and many visitors come to this popular Kyoto “power spot.”
  • Toyokuni-jinja Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Prefecture Kyoto-shi Higashiyama-ku Yamato-dori-dori Front Chayamachi 530
    This is a Shinto shrine in the Higashiyama district dedicated to Toyotomi Hideyoshi. Abandoned with the fall of Toyotomi and the orders of the House of Tokugawa, it was nevertheless rebuilt later under the imperial command of Emperor Meiji. The karamon gate, a remnant of Fushimi Castle, represents Momoyama culture and is designated a National Treasure. There are also several Important Cultural Properties on display including Hideyoshi’s six-legged Chinese-style chest stored in the shrine sanctuary.
  • Fujimori-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    72 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Fushimi-ku Fukakusatorisakichou 609
    A Shinto shrine located in Fushimi Ward, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture. There are various theories regarding its establishment, but it is said that this is the site where Empress Jingu buried and enshrined an array of armaments in 203. During the Fujimori Festival held on May 5, an event called the Kakeuma Shinji is held—horseback riders perform stunts such as head stands and riding sideways, attracting throngs of visitors. Known as a shrine dedicated to luck in victory, scholarship, and horses, the shrine is frequently visited by people with an interest in horse racing.

    Fujinomori Shrine is famous for its horse race, which takes place on May the 5th. The spring water "Fujino Mizu" is refreshing.

  • Jonan-gu Shrine
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    4.5
    119 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Fushimi-ku Nakajimatobarikyuchou 7
    A Shinto shrine in Fushimi Ward, Kyoto City known as Katayoke no taisha (the Direction Warding Shrine). Emperor Shirakawa had a grand villa built here in the Heian period after his retirement, making the area into a political and cultural center. Rites were conducted here to pray for the emperor’s safety when he traveled to visit the temples of Kumano and the temple is still strongly popular among the faithful today for providing divine aid with construction, manufacturing, moving to a new location, traveling, and traffic safety. Visitors can enjoy seasonal flowers in the temple’s spacious garden. The temple holds Kyokusui no utage (Meandering Stream Banquets) in spring and autumn, events which are famed as displays of imperial elegance.

    I went to Jonangu shrine early March during the weekdays. Just a couple of tourist and group of local aunties around which is great for me taking my sweet time enjoying the beauty of the...

  • Izumo Daijingu Shrine
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    4.0
    52 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kameokashi Chitosechouchitose No way out
    Izumo Daijingu Shrine is famous as a shrine for marriage. There is an abundance of things to see including the Meoto-iwa that links the red strings of fate attached to marriage charms, the miraculous Manai water that gushes from Mt. Mikage as the goshintaizan (mountain worshiped as the sacred dwelling place of a deity or deities) and the iwakura where good fortune resides. Prayers for marriage are held on the fourth Sunday of every month.

    一部見ごろの情報があったので、20181112AMに参拝した。 大鳥居周辺、拝殿右手他は、見ごろの状態にあった。 全体を眺めるとまだ、青葉が残る。 銀杏は落葉が進み、落ち葉の敷絨毯と化していた。

  • Ichihime-jinja Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Shimogyou-ku Kawaramachigojou Below the First Level Nishijiru
    This was built in 795 by Fujiwara no Fuyutsugu under orders of Emperor Kammu. The enshrined deities are all goddesses, and as successive generations of empress believed in the shrine as a protector of women it is famous for helping with marriage, children and childbirth. The card-shaped charms are popular.
  • Oharano-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    22 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Nishikyou-ku Oharanominamikasugachou 1152
    A Shinto shrine located in Oharano, Nishikyo Ward founded in 784 by Empress Consort Fujiwara no Otomuro, originally of the Fujiwara clan, in Nagaoka-kyo to enshrine the patron gods of the Kasuga-taisha in Nara. The main shrine building standing today was constructed in 850, as were the Kasuga-zukuri style inner shrine and Koisawano-ike Pond modeled after Sarusawa-ike Pond. Today, the shrine is a widely renowned site for viewing fall foliage, with the approximately 200 meter long approach to the shrine becoming a deep red tunnel bustling with visitors during the season.

    A peaceful Shinto Shrine located towards the south west corner of Kyoto city. This is also popular for the "Sengan-zakura", a famous cherry tree which is well-known for its spectacular autumn...

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Its wooden tea houses, shuffling geisha, and spiritual sights have seen Kyoto hailed as the heart of traditional Japan, a world apart from ultramodern Tokyo. Despite being the Japanese capital for over a century, Kyoto escaped destruction during World War II, leaving behind a fascinating history which can be felt at every turn, from the fully gold-plated Kinkakuji Temple down to traditional customs such as geisha performances and tea ceremonies, which are still practiced to this day.

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