Sightseeing Spot Spots in Ishikawa Area

  • Shiroyone Senmaida (A Thousand Rice Paddies in Shiroyone)
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Pref. Wajimashi Shiroyonemachi
    This nationally famous Shiroyone Town, Wajima City, Ishikawa Prefecture is a scenic spot where as many as 1,004 terraced rice paddies spread along the narrow steep slope between the national highway and the Sea of ​​Japan., The layers of small rice fields continue to the coast, and the contrast of the green and blue is spectacular. The rice terraces, representative of the world agricultural heritage “Noto no Satoyama Satoumi,” are visited by many tourists. Because machines are unable to enter the fields, the rice is produced manually to the present day. There is a system where individuals can own their own rice paddy. In the winter, an illumination event, “Azeno Kirameki,” is held.
  • Korinbo
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Pref. Kanazawashi Kourimbou
    "Located a 10 minute scheduled bus ride away from the east exit of JR Kanazawa Station, this bustling shopping and business center, one of the biggest in the Hokuriku area, was named after a monk who practiced on Mt. Hiei. The area around the ""Korinbo"" bus stop is surrounded by large shopping malls, making it a convenient destination for shopping, dining, and relaxing. Meanwhile, a short distance away, the Nagamachi Bukeyashiki-dori Street samurai residence district is lined with stone paved alleys and ochre earthen walls reminiscent of the Edo period. Here visitors can find samurai residences open to the public and museums with magnificent old architecture as well as beautiful Japanese gardens, and in turn get a glimpse of what life was like for Japan's ancient warriors. The free 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa is also located nearby."
  • World's Longest Bench
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Pref. Hakuigunshikamachi Aikami
    Recognized by Guinness World Records as the World’s Longest Bench in 1989, the bench along the Masuhogaura Coast is 460.9 meters in length. You can purchase lunch baskets and drink sets, and rent beach parasols and bench cushions at the nearby Roadside Station Togiumikaido. It’s prefect for families, couples, and groups.
  • Onomatopoeia Statues
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Hakui-shi Kawaramachi
    This stone statues stand around the traffic circle in front of JR Hakui Station. The five statues were created by sculptor Hiroshi Mabuchi, a graduate of the Kanazawa College of Art. Hakui City is a “UFO town”– records note sightings of flying saucers dating back to the Edo period. These statues of Japanese sci-fi onomatopoeia were placed here in 2005 by the Hakui Station Ekimae Shopping Street Business Cooperative as part of efforts to revitalize Hakui. Visitors can stand, pose, and take pictures on top of statues of onomatopoeia such as “ジャーン(jyaaan)” Featured on TV and in various other media, an unending stream of tourists make their way here to strike an unusual pose and take a commemorative photo or two.
  • Kumasaka Riverside
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Kaga-shi Daishoji
    Rows of cherry trees line a one-kilometer-long stretch of the Kumasaka River, a distributary of the Daishoji River. The sight of around200 trees in bloom, which usually occurs in early April, heralds the coming of spring to the Daishoji area. The trees were planted to commemorate repair work conducted along the river after a great fire in the early Showa period, and when they flower on either side, they create a tunnel of pale pink blossoms. During the flowering season, the Kumasakagawa Yozakura Night Market, one of the biggest events of the Daishoji area, is held – food and drink is sold and a variety of events are conducted. Paper lanterns provide illumination for the market, creating a gentle atmosphere amidst which visitors can take in the flowers.
  • Fountain
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Kanazawa-shi Kenrokumachi
    A fountain fed by Kasumigaike Pond in the center of the Kenrokuen garden. The fountain’s waters jet 3. 5 meters into the air and are powered by the natural water pressure created by a difference in height with the pond’s surface. The fountain was constructed at the end of the Edo period. Records state it was constructed in part to test a method for bringing water into the outer citadel of Kanazawa Castle, and the facility provides a glimpse into the technological capabilities of the time. It is thought that water was piped from the Tatsumi Canal, which penetrated into the garden, from in front of the Nijibashi Bridge via a pipe built into the Ishikawa Bridge. The fountain is a highly unusual feature for a Japanese garden and is also thought to be the oldest in Japan.
  • Hisago Pond
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Kanazawa-shi Kenrokumachi
    A gourd-shaped pond sprawling on the west side of the Kenrokuen garden. The area was once known as “Renchitei” (“Lotus Pond Garden”), and it is believed that creation of the Kenrokuen, counted as one of Japan’s three most famous gardens, began in the vicinity. The pond’s name literally mean “gourd” and was given to it because of its shape. Walk around its banks and you can take in a variety of views so different from each other you wouldn’t think they all involved the same pond. There are two big and small islands in the pond modeled after legendary islands of youth and longevity and mountain wizards, and these, along with the Kaisekito six-tier stone pagoda standing on the center island, are popular photography spots.
  • Kyokusui
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Kanazawa-shi Kenrokumachi
    The collective name for the small streams flowing through the Kenrokuen garden, considered one of Japan’s three most famous gardens along with Kairakuen Park in Mito and the Korakuen Garden in Okayama. Starting at the foot of Yamazakiyama, the 570-meter long stream system winds its way through the garden. The waters are so clear, you can see the bottom, and are supplied from the Tatsumi Canal, whose source in turn is the Sai River. The Tatsumi Canal is an important source of water in Kanazawa; waters drawn from It are fed into a settling basin in the garden to remove sediment, after which they are used to provide water for the garden’s trees and flowers. There are many highlights along the stream system, but the standout is the Hanami Bridge from which can be seen cherry blossoms, Japanese irises, and azaleas when in season. Many are also delighted by the views of fresh verdure in summer, fall foliage in autumn, and snowscapes in winter.
  • Yukizuri
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Kanazawa-shi Kenrokumachi
    Yukizuri is a method of protecting tree branches from breaking under the heavy snows of the Hokuriku region. Yukizuri work begins being conducted on the trees in the Kenrokuen garden in most years at the beginning of November. Numerous ropes sprawling from the tops of the trees like an umbrella create a beautiful geometric shape which accents the winter snowscape. Yukizuri is conducted on all of the over 500 trees in the garden over more than a month, entirely by hand and without the use of heavy machinery. The yukuzuri applied to the Karasaki Pine, which boasts the most beautiful form of any of the trees in the garden, is particularly stunning. A wintertime tradition in Kanazawa, the shape of yukizrui is even used in the Kanazawa tourism logo.
  • Kasumigaike Pond
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Kanazawa-shi Kenrokumachi
    This pond is located in the center of the Kenrokuen garden, considered one of Japan’s three most famous gardens along with Kairakuen Park in Mito and the Korakuen Garden in Okayama. The largest of the garden’s ponds, its surface area is 5,800 square meters and it is 1. 5 meters deep at its deepest point. The expansive, secluded pond serves as a symbol of the garden, and the colors of its waters vary depending on the position from which one is looking. Many of the garden’s most famous sights are found here, including the Kotoji Stone Lantern, Nijibashi Bridge, Karasaki Pine, and the Sazaeyama hill. The primary walking path around the pond is without hills and incorporates universal design principles, ensuring that even wheelchair users can leisurely traverse the path. Visitors can enjoy the seasonal views along the path.
  • Kinjo Reitaku (Sacred spring)
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Kanazawa-shi Kenrokumachi 1-3
    "This well hasa mystical legend behind it, located on the grounds of Kanazawa Shrine adjacent to Kenrokuen Garden. A quiet spring bubbles out of the foot of a hill called Ho-ozan, and according to legend, a man named Imohori Togoro was washing yams in the flowing water when gold dust came out of them. It came to be called the ""gold washing marsh"" (""kanearai no sawa""), which is said to be the source of the name Kanazawa. Nowadays, the spring is famous as a spot with mystical powers, and many tourists visit it along with Kanazawa Castle Park and Kenrokuen Garden."
  • Tatsumi Canal
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Kanazawa-shi Tobiumecho
    This canal, counted as one of the three most famous and beautiful in Japan, was used for firefighting in Kanazawa Castle as well as to supply water for its residents and fill its moat, in addition to being used for agricultural purposes. 10-kilometers-long in total, the canal was built by Itaya Hyoshiro in 1632 on the order of Maeda Toshitsune, third lord of Kaga Domain. A lush nature trail follows a two-kilometer-long stretch of the canal between Daidowari and Nishiki-machi.
  • Yumoto no Hiroba
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Nanao-shi Wakuramachi
    A plaza with bronze statues of the white herons at the center of the legend behind the establishment of the Wakura Onsen hot spring district; a fountain in the plaza is supplied with water directly from a source spring. The fountain can be used to make “hot spring eggs,” custard-like soft boiled eggs; just put a basket of raw eggs in the fountain and 12-15 minutes later you can enjoy delicious hot spring eggs. The water comes direct from the spring and is extremely hot, so take care not to burn yourself while you have fun.
  • Toganokidai Parking Lot
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Hakusan-shi Chugu
    From this popular parking area, visitors can enjoy the beautiful contrast created in fall by snow-capped Mt. Haku and the surrounding autumn foliage. Since the parking area is located close to the border between Ishikawa Prefecture and Gifu Prefecture, the Fukubedani Gardens Observatory is also a 25-minute walk away. Surrounded by natural forest, the parking area is also a rare place where one can occasionally glimpse the cycle of renewal and see where large trees have fallen and new vegetation is rushing to fill its place.
  • Tsuzumi-mon Gate
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Pref. Kanazawashi Kinoshimbomachi
    A huge gate built in JR Kanazawa Station's east plaza to serve as a new area symbol as part of the station's remodeling in line with the opening of the Hokuriku Shinkansen Line. The 13.7 meter high gate is modeled after a shirabeo drum used in traditional Kaga hosho music. In contrast with the glass and aluminum dome extending from the station to the gate, the gate itself is made of wood, evoking the history and traditions of the area. The beautiful spiraling pillars and gently curving latticework roof are also functional, concealing exhaust towers connected beneath the plaza.
  • Boramachi Yagura
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Hosu-gun Anamizumachi Neki Nakai
    "This wooden tower was built in the Noto Peninsula's Nanao Bay in Ishikawa Prefecture to catch striped mullet. Striped mullet are extremely wary; when standard fishing methods are used, they notice the presence of humans and flee for safety. Accordingly, people would wait on top of tall wooden towers and watch the movements of schools of striped mullet, pulling up a net placed in advance to catch the fish when the timing was right. Astronomer Percival Lowell wrote down this fishing feature on his book ""NOTO"". This style of fishing was abolished in 1966 and the population of striped mullet fishing since that time has dramatically declined; today, this tower stands as a monument and sightseeing destination."
  • Noto RailwayNoto-Kashima Station
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Hosu-gun Anamizumachi Sobuku
    "This station is located on the Noto Railway Nanao Line, which connects Wakura Onsen and Anamizu. The compact, old-fashioned station building sports a weather vane on its roof, and its wooden walls are painted pink and white. Dozens of Yoshino cherries grow along the station platforms, and because of the beautiful scenery they create in spring when the flowers are in bloom, the station is nicknamed ""Noto Sakura (Cherry Blossom) Station."" In 1999, the station was chosen as one of the 100 Train Stations in the Chubu region. A cherry blossom festival is also held at the station when the trees are in bloom."
  • Hanayome Shop Curtain
    rating-image
    4.0
    28 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Nanao-shi Madashimachi Tsu Department 49

    This museum shows traditional wedding custom in Ishikawa. Bridal curtains inside the museum were pretty and they are all hand-painted. You can also see bridal costumes for women showcased inside the...

  • Korinbo
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Kanazawa-shi Korinbo
  • Ipponmatsu Park
    rating-image
    3.0
    2 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Ishikawa Wajima-shi Kawaimachi 14

    輪島のお花見スポットです。輪島駅前バス停からも近い公園です。桜の時期にはお花見するのにサイコーですね。

Ishikawa Areas

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Long, thin Ishikawa prefecture runs along the Sea of Japan up into Noto Peninsula. Highlights of the seaside towns lining the west coast include Kanazawa, often described as a "Little Kyoto" thanks to its old wooden tea houses and geisha culture as well as its picturesque Japanese garden, Kenroku-en.

Ishikawa Photo Album

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