Spots in Kamakura Area

  • Kotoku-in Temple (Kamakura Daibutsu)
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    4.5
    3033 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Hase 4-2-28
    A Pure Land Buddhist temple founded by the great priest Honen. The 11.3 meter tall, 121 ton giant copper Buddha statue known as the Kamakura Daibutsu, a National Treasure, is the temple’s principal object of worship and depicts a seated Amitabha. The original daibutsu was made of wood and was destroyed by a typhoon. The copper form of the current statue first began to be cast in 1252. This figure, too, was damaged by typhoons and earthquakes but was repaired each time, leading to its current excellent condition. The interior of the statue can be viewed and from here visitors can see evidence of the repairs that have been made.

    Been there with friends last week.not so far from the station best place to spend your time with friends and also with family as well .located on the peaceful environment.you can get there souvenirs...

  • Hasedera Temple
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    4.5
    1727 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Hase 3-11-2
    Hasedera Temple is located around five minutes’ walk from Hase Station on the Enoden Line. Besides the Kannon Hall, which houses an impressive statue of Kannon (the Goddess of Mercy) with eleven heads, the temple complex also includes six other main buildings, including the Amida-do, Taikoku-do, and Benten-do buildings. Hasedera Temple is situated in one of the most scenic parts of Kamakura, and there is an observation platform with spectacular views of Kamakura’s streets and coastline. With beautiful trees and flowers that change with the seasons, the Hasedera Temple has been called “Kamakura’s Western Paradise,” and is affectionately known as the “temple of flowers.”

    Very nice temple, plenty of little inlets and sub-shrines to check out, including one in a cave. If you can go during late May/early June there are lovely hydrangeas blooming everywhere.

  • Hōkokuji Temple
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    4.5
    706 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Joumyouji 2-7-4
    The Hōkokuji Temple (famous in Japan as the “Bamboo Temple”) was founded in 1334 on the orders of Ashikaga Ietoki, the grandfather of Ashikaga Takauji (the first Shogun of the Ashikaga Shogunate). Visitors can drink tea in the Kyuko-an teahouse while viewing the bamboo grove. The writing table that the literary giant Kawabata Yasunari used while writing “The Sound of the Mountain” is preserved in the Hon-do (Main Hall). Zazen meditation sessions are held in the Kasho-do hall on Sundays; beginners are welcome.

    We really enjoyed our visit here. Beautiful surroundings and serene gardens. With so many temples in Kamakura, this one is surely not to be missed.

  • Kenchoji Temple
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    4.5
    535 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Yamanouchi 8
    A 15 minute walk from Kita-Kamakura Station. This celebrated Buddhist temple, the head temple of Rinzai Kenchoji Buddhism, is the first of the “Kamakura Gozan” (Five Mountain Temples of Kamakura) and was also Japan’s first Zen Buddhist temple. The temple was founded by Hojo Tokiyori, the fifth shogun of the Kamakura shogunate, and the monk Lanxi Daolong. The highlight of the temple is its garden, which was designated a national Place of Scenic Beauty and Historic Site in 1932. The ancient Chinese junipers growing in front of the temple and the garden pond behind the abbot’s chamber are particularly famous for their beauty. The temple also periodically holds sutra copying and zazen meditation sessions which enable average people to experience Zen training.

    The Kenchoji is one of Kamakura’s most important Zen temples and has many great historic sites and nature spots to offer. From the mysterious Butsuden Buddha Hall, a garden designed by a Zen master...

  • Zeniarai Benzaiten Ugafuku Shrine
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    4.0
    438 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Sasuke 2-25-16
    Popularly known as “Zeniarai Benzaiten,” the Zeniarai Benzaiten Ugafuku Shrine is located in the Sasuke district of Kamakura City. According to legend, the shrine was founded when, in the evening of the Day of the Snake in the Month of the Snake in 1185, Minamoto no Yoritomo was told in a dream that “If you pray to the Shinto deities and to the Buddha at this spring, peace will come to the land.” Subsequently, after the local ruler Hojo Tokiyori washed coins in the spring while praying for the prosperity of his clan, the belief spread that washing coins in the spring inside the cave would cause that money to increase. This practice is believed to be particularly effective if performed on the day of the temple festival dedicated to the goddess Benten, so the Shrine is usually thronged with worshippers on that day. The spring at the Zeniarai Benzaiten Ugafuku Shrine is classed as one of the “Five Famous Springs of Kamakura.”

    We actually found the place accidentally on our way back to the Kamakura station. It is really nice and something special made in a cave and with the water flowing from the stone down. The nicest...

  • Engakuji Temple
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    4.5
    500 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Yamanouchi 409
    Located in Yamanouchi, Kamakura City, this is the head temple of Rinzai Engakuji Buddhism. The temple is also considered the second of the “Kamakura Gozan” (Five Mountain Temples of Kamakura). The temple was built by the eighth shogun regent Hojo Tokimune in order to spread Zen Buddhism and impartially memorialize, without distinction between enemy and ally, those who died in the Mongol invasions of Japan. Today, the temple is still used to train Zen priests; ordinary people can also experience weekend zazen meditation sessions and other Zen training here as well. In addition, the Butsunichian and Nyoian temples on the grounds have a café and “amamidokoro” Japanese-style sweets café where customers can enjoy matcha powdered green tea and sweets.

    I dont know if it was just a peculiarity of when I visited, but a lot of the buildings were closed off, including (disappointingly) the one that claims to house the finger relics of the Buddha...

  • Meigetsu-in Temple
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    4.0
    428 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Yamanouchi 189
    A Rinzai Kencho-ji Temple Buddhist temple located in Kamakura. The temple’s honorific mountain name is Fukugensan. The temple is also known as the Hydrangea Temple and during the rainy season the approach to the temple is covered with French hydrangea blossoms. The temple was once a sub-temple to the Zenko-ji Temple, but this temple was abolished in the early years of the Meiji period and now only the Meigetsu-in remains. A large circular window is built into the head priest’s chamber which gives a spectacular view of the garden. The window represents the cosmos and the mind and the unique view it provides has made it a popular subject for photographs.

    The Meigetsuin is also known as the Hydrangea Temple since its covered in beautiful blue hydrangea flowers during Japans rainy season in June. Many visitors will come to see the hundreds of...

  • Tsurugaoka Hachimangu
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    4.0
    7 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Yukinoshita 2-1-31
    Tsurugaoka Hachimangu was called the guardian deity of the samurai of Kamakura. The story of the shrine began when Minamoto no Yoriyoshi transferred the division of the kami (deity) from Iwashimizu Hachimangu in Kyoto, where he prayed for good fortune in warfare, to Yuigahama and re-enshrined Hachiman kami as the clan deity of the Minamoto clan after the Oshu region was pacified. Later, when Minamoto no Yoritomo entered Kamakura under the banner of reviving the Minamoto clan, the shrine was moved to its current location, and was later reorganized into two shrines, the upper and lower shrines, befitting the Kamakura shogunate's sosha (headquarters). The shrine is still popular today as a shrine associated with the samurai Genji clan and Minamoto no Yoritomo, and is sometimes counted as one of the three major Hachiman shrines. Yabusame (traditional horseback archery) ritual is held every year in spring and fall, performed by the samurai archer dressed in traditional hunting costumes from the Kamakura period. It is spectacular.

    軽食や甘味がいただけるお店で、店内のテーブル席でいただけます。お店の前は池にせり出したテラスのようになっていて、ここからの源氏池の眺めはお勧めです。

  • Sasuke Inari Shrine
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    4.0
    155 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Sasuke 2-22-12
    According to legend, prior to the establishment of the Kamakura Shogunate by Minamoto no Yoritomo, an Inari spirit (in the form of a white fox) appeared to Yoritomo in a dream and told him the best time to launch an attack on his enemies the Heike clan. Following this advice, Yoritomo succeeded in crushing the Heike and became the first Shogun of the Kamakura Shogunate. In gratitude, Yoritomo had the Sasuke Inari Shrine built. Due to the influence of this legend, worshipping at the Sasuke Inari Shrine is believed to be helpful for one’s work and future career prospects.

    What stands out the most are the impressive red Tori gates leading up the the main temple. This Shinto shrine is dedicated to the Fox (Inari) deity. The Inari deity is very much honored and...

  • Jochi-ji Temple
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    4.0
    142 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Yamanouchi 1402
    Founded in 1281, the Jochi-ji Temple ranks fourth among the “Five Mountains of Kamakura” (i.e. the five most prestigious temples in Kamakura). According to tradition, the temple was built in commemoration of Hojo Munemasa (the third son of Hojo Tokiyori), who died young. At the entrance to the temple precincts is the famous “Well of Sweet Dew,” one of the “Ten Wells of Kamakura.” The San-mon (main gate) has a rare Chinese-style bell-tower; the Jochi-ji Temple is the only temple in Kamakura where this kind of bell-tower can be seen.

    Lovely peaceful zen temple nestling in the mountainside above the main road in Kita-Kamakura. Beautiful grounds. A little gem.

  • Sugimoto Temple
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    4.0
    124 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Nikaidou 903
    According to tradition, the Sugimoto Temple was founded in 734 by the bodhisattva Gyoji, making it the oldest Buddhist temple in Kamakura; it is the first temple on the Bando Sanjusan Kannon pilgrimage circuit (of temples dedicated to Kannon, the Goddess of Mercy). Visitors approach the temple up a flight of moss-covered stone steps, bordered by banners that help to create a solemn and sacred atmosphere, before reaching the Niomon Gate, with statues of two Deva Kings (guardian deities) that are said to have been carved by the famous sculptor Unkei. In the Hon-do hall there are three statues of the goddess Kannon with 11 faces; of these three statues, the one that according to tradition was carved by Ennin and the one that is reputed to have been carved by Genshin have both been designated as National Important Cultural Properties.

    After Raiko-ji Temple, I was walking along the foot of hills slightly downward. I found a road running along the bottom of a ravine. I walked along the street and found Sugimoto-Kannon Busstop. I...

  • Kamakura-gu Shrine
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    4.0
    110 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Nikaidou 154
    A Shinto shrine located in the Nikaido neighborhood of Kamakura. The shrine is also called Otonomiya (Great Tower) Shrine. The shrine is dedicated to Prince Moriyoshi, son of Emperor Go-Daigo, who toppled the Kamakura shogunate and brought about the Kenmu Restoration. The shrine was founded in 1869 by Emperor Meiji. Protective lion mask charms are sold at the front shrine. These charms are derived from Prince Moriyoshi, who hid a lion mask charm inside his helmet when he went to battle to ensure his safety. There is also a dungeon behind the main shrine building where Prince Moriyoshi is believed to have been imprisoned for nine months. A 30-minute walk from the East Exit of Kamakura Station. There is also a bus bound for Kamakura-gu (Otonomiya) Shrine which leaves from the station.

    Kamakuragu is not the most famous and popular shrines for new year visit to pray in Kamakura; but it is good. Not too crowded; but they have all elements as a Kamakura shrine. It is sufficiently...

  • Gokuraku-ji Temple
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    3.5
    106 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Gokurakuji 3-6-7
    This Buddhist temple was founded in 1259 by the samurai Hojo Shigetoki. The temple was once one of the greatest in Kamakura, but earthquakes, fires, and other tragedies have resulted in only the Kissho-in, the main temple building, still standing today. The temple’s principal object of worship, a figure of Gautama Buddha in the Seiryo-ji Temple style, is a designated Important Cultural Property and is only revealed to the public for three days each year starting on April 7 and overlapping with the Hana Matsuri (celebration of the Buddha’s birthday) on April 8.

    It might be small, but its wonderfully empty after youve visited the more popular temples of the area. Very easy to find if you take the Enoden Line to Gokurakuji Station (we actually walked from...

  • Joju-in Temple
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    4.0
    113 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Gokurakuji 1-1-5
    Founded in 1219 by Hojo Yasutoki, third regent of the Kamakura shogunate, this Buddhist temple was lost to fire in 1333 and eventually rebuilt in the Edo period. A three-minute walk from Gokurakuji Station on the Enoshima Electric Railway, visitors can enjoy a sweeping view of the Yuigahama neighborhood from a small hill on the temple grounds after climbing a flight of 108 steps. Dedicated to Acala, the temple is nicknamed the “Enmusubi Fudo,” or “Marriage Acala Temple,” and accordingly is a popular destination for people seeking fulfillment in love.

    The Temple has amazing views, over the coastline. Steep incline to reach this temple, wear walking shoes.

  • Egara Tenjin Shrine
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    4.0
    90 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Nikaidou 74
    Located in Nikaido, Kamakura City, Egara Tenjin Shrine enshrines the deity of learning Sugawara-no-Michizane, and along with Dazaifu-tenmangu Shrine and Kitano-tenmangu Shrine, it is counted as one of Japan’s three largest Tenjin shrines. The plum tree in front of the main building is known to be the earliest blooming plum tree in Kamakura, and one can see its red flowers in January when it is the season for Japanese students to take entrance exams. There is also the Kappa Fudezuka (Kappa brush monument) built as a memorial to the favorite paintbrush of manga artist Kon Shimizu, and behind that is the Efudezuka monument upon which 154 cartoonists including Ryuichi Yokoyama have added different pictures of kappa created in homage of Shimizu.

    Masses crowded here for their new year activities. Managing the crowds had the police on duty busy, though the crowds were very orderly and abiding.

  • Zuisenji Temple
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    4.0
    80 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Nikaidou 710
    The Zuisenji Temple was founded in 1327 by Muso Kokuji (Muso Soseki), a monk famous as a garden designer who created the gardens at the Tenryu-ji Temple and Saiho-ji Temple in Kyoto. From the Tennyo-do cave (a large cave cut out of the side of the hill), with the Nikaido Momijiga-yatsu (Valley of the Maple Trees) providing a magnificent backdrop, visitors can view the peaceful Iwaba garden, one of the earliest examples of the Sho-in style of garden (a type of garden intended to be viewed from a particular spot adjacent to the garden). The Zuisenji Temple Garden has been designated as a National Special Place of Scenic Beauty and Place of Scenic Beauty; the garden is especially beautiful in the autumn when the leaves are changing color.

    There are many beautiful temples in Kamakura, but this one is slightly off the beaten track accessible via an uphill walk on the outskirts of town. It is worth the walk. The temple is surrounded by...

  • Goryo-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    112 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Sakanoshita 4-9
    A five-minute walk from Hase Station, this Shinto shrine is dedicated to the samurai Kamakura Gongoro Kagemasa and is thus nicknamed Kamakura Gongoro Shrine. According to legend, Kagemasa continued to defeat his enemies in battle even after losing his left eye mid-fight, and thus this shrine is believed to provide good fortune in achieving victory as well as in educational endeavors. The shrine is also famous for its French hydrangeas, and many visitors like to take photos of the Enoshima Electric Railway running in front of the shrine together with the hydrangeas. During the Masked Parade, a prefecturally designated Intangible Folk Property held in September, participants march past wearing tengu goblin and old man masks to pray for large harvests and easy childbirth.

    Small but well formed old shrine tucked away in the back streets of Kamakura and over a small crossing on the Enoden.

  • Kakuonji Temple
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    4.5
    52 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Nikaidou 421
    Located in Nikaido, Kamakura City, this is a temple belonging to the Shingon Buddhist School’s Sennyuji sect. Its honorific mountain name is Jubuzan. The temple originated from the Okura Yakushido built in 1218 by Yoshitoki Hojo, the second regent to the Kamakura shogunate. According to temple legend it was converted in 1296 into a Buddhist temple with Chikai Shine as its founding priest by the ninth regent Sadatoki Hojo, who had prayed that the third Mongol invasion would be repulsed. The lush green temples grounds have been designated as a national historic site, and the atmosphere of the Kamakura period is conveyed to the present. It is prohibited to move about freely on the premises and visitors may only see the temple under the guidance of a priest at designated times. Photography is prohibited during the visit.

    Very calm place in a quiet neighborhood. There are some other temples around as well. If youre looking for peace and silence, this is it

  • Inamuragasaki Onsen
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    3.5
    63 Reviews
    Accommodations / Hot Spring
    1-16-13 Inamuragasaki, Kamakura City, Kanagawa Prefecture
    This day-trip onsen found along the coastline between Kamakura and Enoshima was renovated in September 2017. The rich golden color of the Moor Hot Spring is the origin of the nickname, Hot Spring of Gold. In the mornings relax with the ocean views and in the evening gaze upon the night skyline of Enoshima.

    Great little onsen with wonderful views, especially around sunset. If staying in the area for a few days it would be cheaper to get a 10-ticket booklet. They frequently change the seating mats in the...

  • Jomyo-ji Temple
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    4.0
    82 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Joumyouji 3-8-31
    Situated along the Kanazawa Kaido Road, this Rinzai Kenchoji Buddhist temple is the fifth of the “Kamakura Gozan” (Five Mountain Temples of Kamakura). The temple was founded by the samurai Ashikaga Yoshikane in 1188. The temple’s principal object of worship, a figure of Gautama Buddha, is enshrined in the main temple. A tea room called the Kisenan also stands on the temple’s quiet grounds, and here you can enjoy a cup of matcha powdered green tea while gazing at a lovely rock garden. Or you can climb the small hill beyond that and enjoy a meal at Ishigama Garden Terrace, a café with a fantastic view.

    This Temple dates back to the 12th century. A short bus ride from the JR line this area is literally a thousand years away. Off the tourist path to say the least. A block from the bus stop and up a...

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Kanagawa prefecture acts as an extension of the Tokyo metropolis that spills over into coastal towns, most notably Yokohama city, heavily populated and known for its Chinatown and seaside attractions. Just the right distance for a day trip out of Tokyo, Kanagawa is home to some of Tokyo's most accessible beaches, including around Kamakura, best known for its Big Buddha. Visitors can also travel a little farther afield for a weekend at Hakone onsen town.

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