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Temple Spots in Kanagawa Area

  • Kotoku-in Temple (Kamakura Daibutsu)
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    4.5
    2963 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Hase 4-2-28
    A Pure Land Buddhist temple founded by the great priest Honen. The 11.3 meter tall, 121 ton giant copper Buddha statue known as the Kamakura Daibutsu, a National Treasure, is the temple’s principal object of worship and depicts a seated Amitabha. The original daibutsu was made of wood and was destroyed by a typhoon. The copper form of the current statue first began to be cast in 1252. This figure, too, was damaged by typhoons and earthquakes but was repaired each time, leading to its current excellent condition. The interior of the statue can be viewed and from here visitors can see evidence of the repairs that have been made.

    Don’t expect to much since this is a shrine but it’s a great site. Cost ¥300 to enter. Could do solo or like minded friends

  • Hasedera Temple
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Hase 3-11-2
    Hasedera Temple is located around five minutes’ walk from Hase Station on the Enoden Line. Besides the Kannon Hall, which houses an impressive statue of Kannon (the Goddess of Mercy) with eleven heads, the temple complex also includes six other main buildings, including the Amida-do, Taikoku-do, and Benten-do buildings. Hasedera Temple is situated in one of the most scenic parts of Kamakura, and there is an observation platform with spectacular views of Kamakura’s streets and coastline. With beautiful trees and flowers that change with the seasons, the Hasedera Temple has been called “Kamakura’s Western Paradise,” and is affectionately known as the “temple of flowers.”
  • Daihonzan Kawasaki Daishi Heikenji Temple
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    4.0
    482 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kawasakishi Kawasaki-ku Daishichou 4-48
    This temple is in Daishi-machi, Kawasaki Ward, Kawasaki City. Founded in 1128, its official name is Shingonshu Chisanha Kongosan Kinjoin Heikenji. It's also known as Yakuyoke Daishi for wiping away bad luck. They also hold various events with roots in the area. Many visitors come here for their first temple visit of the year when lots of stalls open on the grounds and the approach to the temple.

    Kawasaki Daishi is a Buddhist temple founded in 1128. The original structure of the temple was destroyed in wars. The current buildings were reconstructed Heian Period Architecture. The five storey...

  • Hōkokuji Temple
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    4.0
    18 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Joumyouji 2-7-4
    The Hōkokuji Temple (famous in Japan as the “Bamboo Temple”) was founded in 1334 on the orders of Ashikaga Ietoki, the grandfather of Ashikaga Takauji (the first Shogun of the Ashikaga Shogunate). Visitors can drink tea in the Kyuko-an teahouse while viewing the bamboo grove. The writing table that the literary giant Kawabata Yasunari used while writing “The Sound of the Mountain” is preserved in the Hon-do (Main Hall). Zazen meditation sessions are held in the Kasho-do hall on Sundays; beginners are welcome.

    The entrance is 300¥ and if you want also green tea 900¥ in total. Not worth it. Sagano bamboo forest in Kyoto is way better and for the tea you have to wait a lot and not many places to see the...

  • Daiyuzan Saijoji Temple
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    4.5
    105 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Minamiashigarashi Daiyuchou 1157
    This Soto Zen temple is in Minamiashigara City, Kanagawa Prefecture. Founded in 1401, it is the main Kanto base for followers of the Tsugen lineage. On the 2nd and 4th Sunday of each month, they hold a Zen mediation workshop in the main hall followed by a Dharma talk. The temple's meditation hall is a Zen training dojo; in the summer there are chances to experience the Zen life, including their Zen meet-up for children, and a summertime Zen study group.

    W stayed at the Canadian house Airbnb and caught the bus up the hill to the temple. I have seen mant beautiful places on my travels and this was stunning. Away from the main temple we were the only...

  • Kenchoji Temple
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    4.5
    516 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Yamanouchi 8
    A 15 minute walk from Kita-Kamakura Station. This celebrated Buddhist temple, the head temple of Rinzai Kenchoji Buddhism, is the first of the “Kamakura Gozan” (Five Mountain Temples of Kamakura) and was also Japan’s first Zen Buddhist temple. The temple was founded by Hojo Tokiyori, the fifth shogun of the Kamakura shogunate, and the monk Lanxi Daolong. The highlight of the temple is its garden, which was designated a national Place of Scenic Beauty and Historic Site in 1932. The ancient Chinese junipers growing in front of the temple and the garden pond behind the abbot’s chamber are particularly famous for their beauty. The temple also periodically holds sutra copying and zazen meditation sessions which enable average people to experience Zen training.

    One of the main temples of Kamakura. Set in beautiful gardens with the backdrop of the mountains. Recommend. I visited it together with the nearby Tsuruagoka Hachiman-gu. The Kencho-Ji is the...

  • Ankokuronji Temple
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    4.0
    18 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Omachi 4-4-18
    This temple began when the priest Nichiren built Ankokuronkutsuji temple close to a cave while writing his Rissho Ankoku Ron treatise. Many historic sites still remain such as the cave where Nichiren took refuge when the hermitage of Matsubagayatsu was set afire due its use as a base for proselytizing. Ankokuronji Temple is also famous for its beautiful flowers on the temple grounds that bloom in each season including peach and cherry trees and hydrangea.

    There are many temples in Kamakura. This is one of those that has few tourist. When Im there, I hardly see anyone came in to this temple. Took some photos and climb up a little to take some scenery

  • Anyoin Temple
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    3.5
    26 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Omachi 3-1-22
    This is a Jodoshu (Pure Land sect of Buddhism) temple in Omachi, Kamakura City. Its honorific mountain name is Gionzan while its temple name is Chorakuji Temple. Chorakuji, the predecessor of the current temple, was built in Hase by Hojo Masako to pray for the soul of her husband Yoritomo, yet it was destroyed by fire due to war in 1333. It was moved to its current location, and the temple name was changed to Masako’s posthumous Buddhist name of Anyoin. On the premises are a giant yew plum pine tree that is more than 700 years old and Masako’s grave, which is marked by a small hokyointo stone pagoda. It is well-known as a famous place to see azaleas and in May the flowers of Omurasaki azalea are in full bloom.

    The temple is beautiful and relaxing. I visited also the grave of Akira Kurosawa that moved me a lot.

  • Enno-ji Temple
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    4.0
    49 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Yamanouchi 1543
    Rinzai Kencho-ji Temple Buddhist temple located in Yamanouchi, Kamakura City. The temple enshrines figures of Enma, judge of the dead, and the ten rulers of the afterlife. Also known as the “Shinkyo Enma-do” and the “Juo-do” in reference to these statues, the temple’s principal object of worship, a wooden seated figure of Enma, is believed to have been created in the Kamakura period by the renowned Buddhist sculptor Unkei. This figure, sometimes called the “Laughing Enma” due to its facial expression, is also called the “Man-Eating Enma” because, according to legend, it once mistakenly ate a child. Two fragrant olive trees grow in front of the main temple, and in October they come into beautiful bloom.

    地方からの旅行なので、ポイントを絞って観光しています。今回は北鎌倉駅周辺を散策しました。閻魔大王様がご本尊だそうです

  • Engakuji Temple
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    4.5
    477 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Yamanouchi 409
    Located in Yamanouchi, Kamakura City, this is the head temple of Rinzai Engakuji Buddhism. The temple is also considered the second of the “Kamakura Gozan” (Five Mountain Temples of Kamakura). The temple was built by the eighth shogun regent Hojo Tokimune in order to spread Zen Buddhism and impartially memorialize, without distinction between enemy and ally, those who died in the Mongol invasions of Japan. Today, the temple is still used to train Zen priests; ordinary people can also experience weekend zazen meditation sessions and other Zen training here as well. In addition, the Butsunichian and Nyoian temples on the grounds have a café and “amamidokoro” Japanese-style sweets café where customers can enjoy matcha powdered green tea and sweets.

    This is an extensive site with acres of space around the temple.....it is a quiet location and very peaceful ambience.but there is no one thing that stands out across the site. Worth a visit if in...

  • Kaizoji Temple
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    4.5
    53 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Ogigayatsu 4-18-8
    Located in Ogigayatsu, Kamakura City, this is a temple belonging to the Rinzai Buddhist School’s Kenchoji sect. Its honorific mountain name is Senkokuzan. It was built in 1253 by Fujiwara no Nakayoshi who had received an order from Prince Munetaka, and was destroyed by fire when the Kamakura shogunate lost power. It is said that the temple was restored in 1394 by Uesugi Ujisada under the command of Ashikaga Ujimitsu, inviting the priest Shinsho Kugai to take occupancy. It is well-known as a temple with flowers blooming in profusion amidst each season, including flowering crab apple, hydrangea, Chinese bellflower, Chinese trumpet vine, Japanese maple and Japanese clover. Located in a cavern behind the Yakushido is the Soko-nuke-no-ido, one of the Kamakura Jissei (the ten wells of Kamakura) with 16 round holes from which water is flowing.

    The temple is great and worth a visit. I especially liked the employees working there. They put a lot of effort and seem to enjoy their work. Fantastic to watch.

  • Kakuonji Temple
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    4.5
    50 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Nikaidou 421
    Located in Nikaido, Kamakura City, this is a temple belonging to the Shingon Buddhist School’s Sennyuji sect. Its honorific mountain name is Jubuzan. The temple originated from the Okura Yakushido built in 1218 by Yoshitoki Hojo, the second regent to the Kamakura shogunate. According to temple legend it was converted in 1296 into a Buddhist temple with Chikai Shine as its founding priest by the ninth regent Sadatoki Hojo, who had prayed that the third Mongol invasion would be repulsed. The lush green temples grounds have been designated as a national historic site, and the atmosphere of the Kamakura period is conveyed to the present. It is prohibited to move about freely on the premises and visitors may only see the temple under the guidance of a priest at designated times. Photography is prohibited during the visit.

    Very calm place in a quiet neighborhood. There are some other temples around as well. If youre looking for peace and silence, this is it

  • Hataage Benzaiten Shrine
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    3.5
    27 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Yukinoshita 2-1-31 Tsuruoka in Hachiman
    Hataage Benzaiten Shrine is located on the grounds of Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine and stands on an island in Genji Pond near Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine’s Third Torii Gate. It is said that Hojo Masako, Minamoto no Yoritomo’s wife, built the shrine after the goddess Benzaiten appeared as the guardian deity of Yoritomo when he was raising his army. Today, the Minamoto clan’s twin-striped flags fly on the shrine grounds and, due to its association with Yoritomo’s efforts to raise an army, the shrine is also visited by numerous worshipers seeking fortune in moving up in the world. In the back of the grounds, there is a stone called the Masako Boulder that Minamoto no Yoritomo prayed to so that his wife would have a safe childbirth. It is believed that praying to this stone helps grant marital bliss.

    鶴岡八幡宮入口近くの源氏池の中島に建つ境内社で、参道や島には源氏の象徴の白い旗が並べられていました。 旗上弁財天社は、源頼朝が源氏復興の旗上げの際に北条政子が建立したと伝えられ、祀られている弁財天は家運長久の守護神だそうです。また神社の裏には、北条政子が懐妊の際に安産を祈って置かれたと言われる「政子石」があり、子宝や安産にご利益があるパワースポットとなっているようです。

  • Gokuraku-ji Temple
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    3.5
    105 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Gokurakuji 3-6-7
    This Buddhist temple was founded in 1259 by the samurai Hojo Shigetoki. The temple was once one of the greatest in Kamakura, but earthquakes, fires, and other tragedies have resulted in only the Kissho-in, the main temple building, still standing today. The temple’s principal object of worship, a figure of Gautama Buddha in the Seiryo-ji Temple style, is a designated Important Cultural Property and is only revealed to the public for three days each year starting on April 7 and overlapping with the Hana Matsuri (celebration of the Buddha’s birthday) on April 8.

    It might be small, but its wonderfully empty after youve visited the more popular temples of the area. Very easy to find if you take the Enoden Line to Gokurakuji Station (we actually walked from...

  • Goryo-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    106 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Sakanoshita 4-9
    A five-minute walk from Hase Station, this Shinto shrine is dedicated to the samurai Kamakura Gongoro Kagemasa and is thus nicknamed Kamakura Gongoro Shrine. According to legend, Kagemasa continued to defeat his enemies in battle even after losing his left eye mid-fight, and thus this shrine is believed to provide good fortune in achieving victory as well as in educational endeavors. The shrine is also famous for its French hydrangeas, and many visitors like to take photos of the Enoshima Electric Railway running in front of the shrine together with the hydrangeas. During the Masked Parade, a prefecturally designated Intangible Folk Property held in September, participants march past wearing tengu goblin and old man masks to pray for large harvests and easy childbirth.

    Small but well formed old shrine tucked away in the back streets of Kamakura and over a small crossing on the Enoden.

  • Kosho-ji Temple
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    3.5
    7 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Yamanouchi 827
    A Jishu Buddhist temple, due to the numerous rhododendrons on the temple’s grounds, it is also known as the Shakunage-dera (Rhododendron Temple). In the Edo period, the area was a community for some of Japan’s Hidden Christians, and the Kosho-ji Temple helped to protect them. Even today, the Nakagawa Cross, family crest of the Christian Nakagawa samurai clan, still decorates the temple’s Gate. A small stone shrine dedicated to Oshabuki sama, god of coughing, stands near the Mountain Gate, and it is said that one’s coughing will stop if one prays to the shrine.

    北鎌倉の駅から大船方面に5分くらい歩いたところにあります。このお寺さんは時宗のお寺ですがキリスト教のクルス紋が山門に付いています。珍しいですよね。また、咳の神様,「おしゃぶき」の祠がありますので。ぜんそくの方はお参りするのもよろしいのでは…

  • Kosoku-ji Temple
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    4.0
    36 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Hase 3-9-7
    A Nichiren Buddhist temple located near the Hase-dera Temple in Kamakura’s Hase neighborhood. After Nichiren’s exile to Sado was ended, Yadoya Mitsunori, who had been set to watch Nichiren’s top disciple, Nichiro, turned his own home into a temple, which was then recognized as a Nichiren temple by Nichiro. “Kosoku” is another way to read the name “Mitsunori,” thus giving rise to the temple’s name. In the back of the grounds visitors can find Yadoya’s grave and the dungeon where Nichiro was confined. The grounds are filled with plants, including a Hall crabapple tree over 200 years old, French hydrangeas, cherry trees, wisteria, and Japanese irises, and the temple is considered one of the best temples for flower viewing in all Kamakura.

    This temple is all about plants and gardens. You’ll find a remarkable set of plantings, mostly labelled, for your enjoyment. There is a graveyard and a small cave for additional interest. And no...

  • Komyo-ji Temple
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    4.5
    3 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Zaimokuza 6-17-19
    The head temple of the Pure Land sect of Buddhism, the Komyo-ji Temple is located close to the Zaimokuza Coast. The temple was founded by Hojo Tsunetoki, the fourth shogun regent, and established as a Pure Land sect temple by Nenna Ryochu, the third founder of Pure Land Buddhism. In the Edo period, the temple was designated the head temple of the Eighteen Pillars of Pure Land Buddhism in Kanto by Tokugawa Ieyasu. The temple is a center for Buddhist faith and study. Today, the temple still conducts sermons, sutra copying, and prayer sessions regularly, which the general public may take part in. The Taima mandara engi emaki picture scroll in the temple’s possession is a National Treasure. The temple is also the originator of the Pure Land Practice of the O-juya (“ten nights”), and a magnificent Juya Hoyo service is held today at the temple each year from October 12 to 15.

    One of the very best Japanese gardens in Kamakura if not THE best. Free of charge. Way off the tourist circuit. What

  • Enoshima Daishi Temple
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    3.5
    39 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Fujisawashi Enoshima 2-4-10
    A Shingon Buddhist temple located on the island of Enoshima. Enoshima Daishi Temple was founded in 1993 on the site of the previously demolished Enoshima-kan inn as the Kanto branch temple of the Saifuku-ji Temple in Kagoshima Prefecture. The temple’s principal object of worship is a figure of Acala. Located in the main temple building, the solemn red statue stands six meters tall, making it one of the largest indoor depictions of Acala in Japan. Goma ceremonies, in which cedar wood is burned before the figure of Acala, are held periodically, and visitors can come to consult with priests and receive Goma ashes and purifying salts.

    I’ve visited Enoshima a lot. But, skipped this temple every time, even though this is along the main path. Finally today I stopped by. Priest was reciting Sutra. Maybe that’s why this place was...

  • Jufuku-ji Temple
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    3.5
    82 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kamakurashi Ogigayatsu 1-17-7
    A Rinzai Kencho-ji Temple Buddhist temple located in the Ogigayatsu neighborhood of Kamakura City. The temple’s honorific mountain name is Kikokusan, while its official temple title is Jufuku Kongo Zen. It is also the third of the “Kamakura Gozan” (Five Mountain Temples of Kamakura). The temple was founded in 1200 by the priest Myoan Eisai after being invited by Hojo Masako, the wife of the shogun Minamoto no Yoritomo. There are gorinto (five ring towers) on the grounds said to be the graves of Hojo Masako and her son Minamoto no Sanetomo.

    Compared to the main temples in Kamakura, this one is hidden in a small alley which is not easy to find. The temple os not big or something that may impress visitors and there are no statues around...

Kanagawa Areas

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Kanagawa prefecture acts as an extension of the Tokyo metropolis that spills over into coastal towns, most notably Yokohama city, heavily populated and known for its Chinatown and seaside attractions. Just the right distance for a day trip out of Tokyo, Kanagawa is home to some of Tokyo’s most accessible beaches, including around Kamakura, best known for its Big Buddha. Visitors can also travel a little farther afield for a weekend at Hakone onsen town.

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