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Shrine Spots in Tokyo Area

  • Yasukuni Shrine
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    4.0
    1589 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Chiyoda-ku Kudankita 3-1-1
    This shrine located in Kudankita of Chiyoda City mainly enshrines soldiers and civilians related to the military who died in service of the country. From patriots at the end of the Edo period and the Meiji Restoration to soldiers that died in combat during the Pacific War, Yasukuni enshrines over 2,466,000 spirits without distinction as to social status, merits or gender. About 400 cherry trees have been planted on the premises, making it a famous spot for hanami (cherry blossom viewing).

    Built as a memorial to all Japanese war dead from the Russo Japanese War onward. The shrine is held in high esteem and also in controversy as it represents the nation aggression in Asia. A huge...

  • Tokyo Daijingu
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    4.0
    429 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Chiyoda-ku Fujimi 2-4-1
    Built in 1880 as a shrine to worship the deities of Ise Shrine, this shrine is well known for being “O-Ise-sama in Tokyo.” Initially it was located in Hibiya, but relocated to Tokyo’s Chiyoda City after the Great Kanto Earthquake. The main deities enshrined are Amaterasu-Sume-Okami and Toyouke-no-Okami. It is also popular as a wedding venue as it is a shrine that originated Shinto weddings. It is visited by many worshippers who pray for good candidates for marriage. In addition to its main festival held every year in April, there are many smaller events held each month.

    Tokyo Daijingu is one of the five major shrines in Tokyo dedicated to all things related to love and relationships. This was the first Shrine holding Shinto wedding ceremony in Japan. Worshippers...

  • Koami Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Chuou-ku Nihombashikoamichou 16-23
    A Shinto shrine located in Nihombashikoami-cho, Chuo City, Tokyo. Dedicated to Inari, the fox god, the shrine has long been known for providing good luck and protection from misfortune. There is a well on the shrine grounds named the Zeniarai no I and popularly known as the Tokyo Zeniarai Benten (money washing well and Tokyo money washing Benten, respectively) which is believed to grant financial luck to those who purify money in its waters; there's also a figure of the tall-headed god Fukurokuju said to reward worshipers with virtue.
  • Suitengu Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Chuou-ku Nihombashikakigarachou 2-4-1
    Suitengu Shrine is a branch shrine of the Kurume Suitengu Shrine in Kurume, Fukuoka Prefecture, and is well known for a place to seek easy childbirth and offer prayers for children. It began when the Arima family of the Kurume Domain established it as a branch on the grounds of their Edo land out of reverence to the Kurume Suitengu Shrine. The shrine is bustling with visitors offering prayers for easy childbirth and children, and on the premises are statues including one of a dog with its litter that presides over a 12-year Chinese zodiac for visitors to touch, and a parent-and-child set of kappa (mythical water-dwelling creatures). The cute ema (votive picture tablets) featuring a dog and its puppies is also popular. A festival is held each year on May 5th.
  • Atago Jinja
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Minato-ku Atago 1-5-3
    This shrine located in Atago’s office zone in Tokyo’s Minato City is built atop the natural mountain Mt. Atago. It was constructed under the orders of Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1603 for the deity of fire protection, and its principle enshrined deity is the god of fire “Homusubi-no-mikoto.” The stone steps at the front are called the “Shusse no Ishidan” (Stairway of Success), well-known for an occasion when a samurai rode his horse up and down the steps and earned the praise of shogun Tokugawa Iemitsu. The premises of the shrine are like an oasis offering opportunities to enjoy cherry blossoms and autumn foliage, and they are often visited by many of the nearby office workers.
  • Hie Jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    644 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Chiyoda-ku Nagatachou 2-10-5
    This shrine located in the Nagatacho district of Tokyo’s Chiyoda City is considered to have begun when Ota Dokan constructed the Edo Castle in 1478 and transferred the guardian deity of Kawagoe Hie Jinja Shrine. After that, it became the tutelary shrine of Edo Castle and the deity was revered as the guardian of the Imperial Palace. Since the current shaden (main building) has been reconstructed, there are 123 works of art on the ceiling of the haiden (worship hall) to commemorate the 50th anniversary since reconstruction. The Sanno torii gate built in the direction of Akasaka is also famous for its unusual shape. Every year in June the Sanno Festival is held which is one of the big three Edo festivals, and the approximately 300-meter long festival procession is quite a sight.

    Its truly amazing how there are shrines and temples that take the hustle and bustle out of the city with a few steps into them. It is a relaxing feature that more urban planners should incorporate.

  • Imado Shrine
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    3.5
    183 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Taitou-ku Imado 1-5-22
    The Imado Shrine in Taito City is known as the birthplace of the “Maneki-neko” (the Beckoning Lucky Cat). The origins of the establishment of the shrine are considered to be in 1063 after a transfer of a deity from Iwashimizu Hachimangu Shrine, Kyoto at the time of the suppression of Oshu by Minamoto no Yoriyoshi and Yoshiie. There are various theories on the origins of the Beckoning Lucky Cat, but it is said that its roots lie in Imado porcelain which was fired in Imado from the 16th century. On the grounds there are many related objects such as a “monument dedicated to the place of origin of Imado porcelain” and the “Nade (stroked) cat statue”. There is no end to the female worshippers visiting the shrine as it is the shrine of the deities of marriage. It is also visited by worshippers who like history as it is the site of the demise of Okita Soji and the Shinsengumi (a special police force in Kyoto during the late shogunate period).

    I didnt see any real cats wandering around here until one appeared at the end of our visit. But there are cat figurines; cat charms; cat vases; cat drawings; myriad depictions of Maneki Neko, the...

  • Meiji Jingu Gyoen (Meiji Jingu Gardens)
    Leisure / Hobbies
    Tokyo Shibuya-ku Yoyogikamizonochou 1-1
    This famous garden was used by the Kato and Ii families from the early Edo period. The iris garden, which Emperor Meiji had planted for Empress Shoken, is famous and looks its best in June. There is also a tea house, arbour and walking path around the garden where you can appreciate the beautiful flowers and trees throughout the year. There is an entrance fee to the garden. The nearest station is Harajuku Station and Meiji-jingumae Station.
  • Kameido Tenjin Shrine
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    4.0
    456 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Koutou-ku Kameido 3-6-1
    This shrine located in the Kameido district of Tokyo’s Koto City venerates the spirit of Sugawara no Michizane. It is also called Tozaifu Tenmangu in respect to Kyushu’s Dazaifu Tenmangu. As Michizane is a god of scholarship, the shrine is popular with students preparing for examinations in the winter. On the premises are many spots related to Michizane and Dazaifu Tenmangu such as fude-zuka (mounds built to hold a service for worn-out writing brushes) and shingyu (divine oxen). Famous for its flowers that bloom in different seasons, it has a wisteria festival from the end of April and is the best place to see wisteria in Tokyo where visitors can view the flowers all over the grounds. Along the path to the shrine from Kameido Station, the town streets overflow with the atmosphere of Tokyo’s shitamachi (working class towns).

    Visited while roaming around Kameido. Pretty nice, but should be nicer when the wisteria are in bloom

  • Nezu Jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    634 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Bunkyou-ku Nedu 1-28-9
    This is a shrine with a long history that is located in the Nezu district of Tokyo’s Bunkyo City is said to have been founded by Yamatotakeru (the 12th Emperor of Japan) about 1,900 years ago. The enshrined deities are Susanoo-no-Mikoto, Oyamakuino-kami and Hondawake-no-Mikoto. The shaden (main shrine building) built in 1706 is completely covered in lacquer and is a masterpiece of gongen-zukuri (style of Shinto architecture in which the main hall and worship hall share one roof, and are connected via an intermediate passageway), and seven buildings have received designation as national Important Cultural Properties. Vermillion-lacquered torii gates stand in a row at the smaller Otome Inari Shrine on the premises, making this a popular spot to take photos. The shrine is visited by many worshippers in April when 3,000 azaleas bloom profusely and in September when one of Edo three biggest festivals is held.

    Its not easy to find the Nezu Shrine, as it hides withing a narrow street and no visible signs in languages other than Japanese. Once you access the grounds, you are taken aback by a sense of...

  • Okunitama Jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    225 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Fuchushi Miyamachi 3-1
    This shrine located in Tokyo’s Fuchu City enshrines Okunitama-no-Okami, the guardian deity of the historical region of Musahi. This deity is well-known as the god of good luck, matchmaking, protection against misfortune, and cleansing from evil. The shrine is said to have been established in 111 and according to legend, shogun Minamoto no Yoritomo made an invocation on behalf of his wife Masako for safe childbirth. Since it enshrined six deities at the end of the Heian period, it came to be called Musashi Rokushogu. There are numerous cultural assets on the premises such as the wooden komainu (guardian lion-dogs) in addition to the shaden (shrine buildings), and the Babadaimon keyaki (zelkova) trees on the path to the shrine are designated as a national natural monument. The Kurayami Matsuri (Darkness Festival) held from April 30th to May 6th is one of the three largest unusual festivals in the Kanto region.

    best to visit early morning time. this shrine is very historic one and rarely seen in center of Tokyo, really.

  • Tomioka Hachimangu Shrine
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    4.0
    316 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Koutou-ku Tomioka 1-20-3
    This shrine located in the Tomioka district of Tokyo’s Koto City is affectionately known as the “Hachiman-sama of Fukagawa” and was established in 1624. The shrine attracted religious faith from the commoners as a tutelary shrine under the Tokugawa shogun family, and every year around August 15th the Fukagawa Hachiman Matsuri (Fukagawa Matsuri) procession is held which is said to be one of the three largest festivals of Edo, boasting Japan’s largest ichi-no-miya mikoshi (portable shrine). It is also famous as the birthplace of Edo’s Kanjin-zumo, and there are many stone monuments on the premises such as the Yokozuna Stone, a stone monument to commend successive yokozuna sumo wrestlers.

    Interesting flea market held at the temple on Sunday mornings. As you might expect, lots of Japanese arts and crafts. Prices seemed reasonable. Worth combining with a visit to the nearby Fukugawa...

  • Karasumori-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    186 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Minato-ku Shimbashi 2-15-5
    A Shinto shrine located a two-minute walk from Shimbashi Station in 2 Chome Shimbashi, Minato City, Tokyo. The shrine was originally built as an Inari shrine by Fujiwara no Hidesato in the Heian period (794-1185) after he was instructed to do so by a white fox who appeared in a dream to him. The shrine is dedicated to Uganomitama no Mikoto; Ninigi no Mikoto; and Amenouzume no Mikoto, the goddess of performing arts. The shrine is said to answer prayers for those seeking victory, aid in the improvement of artistic abilities, grant prosperity in business, and promote peace and wellbeing in the home.

    This is a small shrine near Shimbashi Station. Its funny to see a shrine nesting among tons of izakayas and bars. If youre in the area check it out.

  • Shoin-Jinja shrine
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    4.0
    128 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Setagaya-ku Wakabayashi 4-35-1
    A Shinto shrine located in Wakabayashi, Setagaya City, Tokyo. The shrine is dedicated to Yoshida Shoin, an intellectual who organized the Shokason-juku private school and who educated many reform-oriented samurai during the closing days of the Edo period. The shrine was built by Shoin's former students in 1882. Shoin is viewed as a god of scholarly learning, and many people visit the shrine to pray for success in matters such as school entrance exams.

    A quiet but beautiful shrine that is a popular cherry blossom spot in spring. It also holds a local festival late October. The shrine is dedicated to Shoin Yoshida, a political reformer who educated...

  • Onoterusaki-jinja Shrine
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    3.5
    35 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Taitou-ku Shitaya 2-13-14
    A Shinto shrine located in 2 Chome Shitaya, Taito City, Tokyo. The shrine was built in 852 in Ueno dedicated to the famed Heian period poet Ono no Takamura. Later, the shrine was moved to its current location and in the late Edo period also became dedicated to the scholar Sugawara no Michizane. In addition to scholarship, the shrine is also believed to aid worshippers seeking help in the performing arts. The shrine's Fuji-zuka, a Mt. Fuji-shaped mound made from lava rock from the mountain in the Edo period, is a nationally designated Important Tangible Folk Cultural Property.

    小野は小野でも小野篁を祀った神社です。下谷の神社仏閣のボス的存在の歴史ある神社です。境内には様々な石碑や歴史の遺物が残っており、見所が多いです。ちょうど七夕の時期のため、笹の葉と短冊という組み合わせも良かったです。

  • Ohmiya-Hachimangu
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    4.0
    89 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Suginami-ku Omiya 2-3-1
    A Shinto shrine located in Omiya, Suginami City, Tokyo. The shrine was built in 1063 by Minamoto no Yoriyoshi. The shrine is dedicated to Emperor Ojin and his father and mother, Emperor Chuai and Empress Jingu. Due to the many events attesting to the deep bonds between these three, many worshipers visit the shrine to pray for aid in easy childbirth, childrearing, and finding marriage. The shrine grounds are host to several subordinate shrines, such as the Ohmiya-Tenmangu, which is dedicated Sugawara no Michizane.

    Though I do not know when it is right here from, it is the shrine which is the nearest from a house. I can feel the four seasons of Musashino when you come here.

  • Hanazono Shinto Shrine
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    4.0
    581 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Shinjuku-ku Shinjuku 5-17-3
    This shrine located in a corner of the downtown Shinjuku district of Tokyo’s Shinjuku City has enshrined the sochinju (local Shinto deity) of Shinjuku since before the Edo Shogunate. Because it was constructed on a beautiful hanazono (“flower garden”) when it was moved in the late 1700s, it was called the Hanazono Inari Jinja, which is the origin of the current shrine name. On the premises are the Itoku Inari Jinja Shrine which is for prayers about prosperity in business, conception of children, and marriage, and the Geino Asama Jinja Shrine which enshrines the deity of performing arts, and the shrine is visited by many worshippers that are women or performers. Every year on the Tori-no-Hi (Bird Day) in November, a Tori-no-Ichi (Bird Day Fair) is held, and this is the shrine’s biggest event that draws a crowd of visitors.

    This pretty shrine is just round the corner from Golden Gai and Kabukicho, so its worth just popping along for a few minutes. The entrance way we used was particularly pretty all lit up at night!

  • Asakusa Shrine
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    4.5
    1313 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Taitou-ku Asakusa 2-3-1
    This shrine is located next to the main hall of Senso-ji. Since it primarily enshrines the three deities Hinokuma-hamanari-no-mikoto, Hinokuma-takenari-no-mikoto, and Hajin-matsuchi-no-mikoto, it is referred to as “Sanja Gongen Shrine” and “Sanja Sama.” The hall of worship, the hall of offerings and the inner sanctuary of the current shrine, completed in 1649, have all been designated by the Japanese government as Important Cultural Properties. The Sanja Matsuri held regularly every year on the third Friday, Saturday and Sunday in May is famous for its dynamic mikoshi (portable shrine) and long procession of people.

    One could see here people coming to offer prayers and also seems many Japanese come with Kimono and take photos, must be a tradition I believe.

  • Togo-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    207 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Shibuya-ku Jingumae 1-5-3
    A Shinto shrine built in 1940 located close to Takeshita Street in Jingumae, Shibuya City, Tokyo. The shrine is dedicated to Togo Heihachiro, commander of Japan's combined fleet during the Russo-Japanese War. Due to the fact that he led Japan to victory in the war, he is also said to be a god of victory and the shrine is visited by large numbers of people praying for success in a given matter.

    This shrine is quite well kept and honors Marshall Togo for the Japanese naval victory over the Russian Baltic Fleet which essentially ended the Russo=Japanese War.

  • Meiji Shrine
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    4.5
    8069 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Shibuya-ku
    This Shinto shrine is dedicated to Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken, and its grounds consist of an inner and outer garden as well as the Meiji Kinenkan, which can be used as a venue for weddings and other ceremonies. A lush forest occupies the inner garden area; beloved as a rare green space in the heart of Tokyo, highlights include the magnificent Honden front shrine; wooden torii gate which is the largest in Japan; the Gyoen garden, which requires a small fee to enter but which is beautiful year-round; and the Kiyomasa Well (located in the Gyoen garden), from which samurai lord Kato Kiyomasa personally drew water. The outer garden is a Japanese-style garden which preserves how the area looked when it was still largely wilderness; highlights include a broadleaf tree-enshrouded walking path; South Pond on which bloom lotuses; and some 1,500 Japanese iris plants spanning 150 varieties which Emperor Meiji had planted for Empress Shoken - the best time to see the irises is from late May through mid-June. The outer garden spans Shinjuku Ward and Minato Ward and its facilities include the free Meiji Memorial Picture Gallery, as well as tennis courts, a baseball stadium, and a variety of other sports facilities. In Fall 2019 as part of events commemorating the shrine's 100th anniversary, the Meiji Jingu Museum was opened to display treasures connected to Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken which were formerly kept in the Meiji Jingu Homotsuden (Treasure Museum).

    very good to walk around see the intricate work of art of this shrine for its Japanese architecture and one can see people all over the world.

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