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Temple Spots in Tokyo Area

  • Yushima Tenmangu (Yushima Tenjin)
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    3.0
    2 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Bunkyou-ku Yushima 3-30-1
    This is a Shinto shrine located in Yushima in Bunkyo City and is representative of an Edo-Tokyo Tenmangu Shrine. It is said that this shrine was built in 458 A.D. by imperial command of Emperor Yuraku in order to enshrine Ameno-tajikaraono-mikoto as a deity. Later in the Nanboku-cho period, Sugawara Michizane was also enshrined. As the Shinto god of scholarship, many students preparing for exams pay homage at the shrine. The precincts are so elegant, and they were the subject of works by the ukiyo-e artist, Utagawa Hiroshige. From early February at the Japanese plum blossom festival (“Ume Matsuri”), the Japanese plums are magnificent in full bloom on the grounds and the festival is busy with sightseers.

    湯島天満宮の表鳥居を入ってすぐ右手にある宝物殿になります。入館料は大人500円でした。1階にはお祭りで使われるような神輿が飾られており、地下には絵画や衣服などが飾られていました。

  • Kanda Shrine (Kanda Myojin)
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Chiyoda-ku Sotokanda 2-16-2
    This shrine located in Soto-Kanda in Tokyo’s Chiyoda City boasts close to 1,300 years of history. In the past, this shrine was revered as the Edo Sochinju (the center place to pray for local gods) with a Soujigami (general local Shinto deity) that was the patron of Tokyo’s 108 towns. There are many commemorative photo spots including the impressive Shaden (main building) built in 1934 that is completely covered in bright vermillion as well as the “Chikara Ishi,” which is a big stone that was used by young people in competitions to show off their strength. The enshrined deities are Okuninushi no Mikoto (Daikokuten), Sukunahikona no Mikoto (Ebisu), and Taira no Masakado. The Kanda-matsuri festival held around mid-May is counted as one of the three largest Edo festivals. The shrine has even become famous in recent years for collaborations with anime works.
  • Jindaiji Temple
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    2.5
    8 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Choufushi Jindaijimotomachi 5-15-1
    Located in the Jindaiji Motomachi district of Tokyo’s Chofu City, this is the special head temple of the Tendai sect of Buddhism and is the second oldest temple in Tokyo after Sensoji Temple. Along with halls such as the Ganzan Daishi hall, with its statue of Ganzan Daishi who attracted faith in the Edo period, and the Shaka-do (Buddha Hall) which enshrines the late Asuka period sitting statue of Shaka Nyorai (the historical Buddha), visitors can enjoy the new green leaves of early summer and the colorful leaves of autumn on the premises. The soba shops in the temple town are famous for their Jindaiji soba. The GeGeGe-no-Kitaro chaya (tea house) which operates with the theme of the comic GeGeGe-no-Kitaro is very popular. The Yakuyoke Ganzan Daishi Taisai (Jindaiji Daruma Festival) held each year on March 3rd and 4th is the temple’s largest event with approximately 300 shops all open during this time!

    山門のすぐとなり(もちろん東側)になります。山門が石段をあがるかたちになりますが、こちらは坂をのぼるかたちです。バリアフリーなのかな?と思いました。門は木を組んだものなので、瓦葺きの山門とは印象が全く異なります。

  • Nishiarai Daishi Temple
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Adachi-ku Nishiarai 1-15-1
    This temple of the Buzan sect of Shingon Buddhism is located in the Nishiarai district of Tokyo’s Adachi City, and is officially known as Gochisan Henjoin Soji-ji. It is said to have been founded in 826 and is considered to have begun when the monk Kukai (Kobo Daishi) visited Nishiarai and personally carved a statue of the eleven-faced Kannon, the principal object of worship in the temple, to help people that were worried about an epidemic that was going around, and also made prayers on their behalf. It flourished in the past as a temple for women to pray for protection against misfortune, and now as one of the three Daishi temples in Kanto it is bustling with visitors every year for hatsu-mode (the first visit to a shrine in the new year). From around early April there are approximately 100 types and 2,500 plants of botan (tree peonies) that bloom all over the temple grounds, and it is famous as a place to see botan.
  • Tsukiji Hongwanji
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    4.0
    1005 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Chuou-ku Tsukiji 3-15-1
    Tsukiji Hongwanji is a building of reinforced concrete construction with a round roof and a big stone staircase. It is an ancient Indian style temple and also looks like a palace. It is a temple of Jodo Shinshu Hongan-ji School located in Tsukiji in Chuo City, Tokyo and was originally built in 1617 in Asakusa as a branch temple of Nishi-hongan-ji temple in Kyoto. Subsequently, the building was relocated to the current building which was constructed to incorporate the designs of the architect, Chuta Ito. The building has been designated as a National Cultural Property. It is famous for having held the funerals of many notable public figures. A theater called “Buddhist Hall” is built on the grounds of the property.

    Beautiful temple. Sat respectfully at rear and listened to monks perform ceremonies with groups of worshippers. Welcome calm and peace after craziness of the markets. Donations for world peace...

  • Daikyoji Temple (Shibamata Taishakuten)
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    4.0
    469 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Katsushika-ku Shibamata 7-10-3
    A temple of the school of Nichiren Buddhism in Shibamata, Katsushika City, Tokyo which was founded in 1629 during the Kan-ei period. As the Taishakuten faith increased during the Edo period, it became familiarly known as “Shibamata Taishakuten” and the number of visitors to the shrine increased together with faith in Koshin, “Koshin Shinko”. It is said that Saint Nichiren carved the principal object of worship at the temple, the deity, Taishakuten. In addition to the magnificent Nitenmon Gates at the Teishakuten entrance, Tamonten (Vaisravana) (Bishamonten), Jikokuten (Dhrtarastra), Komokuten (Virupaksa) and Zochoten (Virudhaka) are also present. There are many highlights such as the gardens and the large temple reception hall which is 495 meters squared (150 tsubo -Japanese unit of land measurement). It is famous also as the temple connected with Tora san’s movie “Otoko wa Tsurai yo”.

    This temple surprised me in every way with its beautiful and intricate wood carvings and an extraordinarily beautiful Japanese garden. Having come here for the first time, despite my numerous visit...

  • Zojoji Temple
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    4.0
    2108 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Minato-ku Shibakouen 4-7-35
    This temple that belongs to the Jodo sect is located in Shiba Park in Tokyo’s Minato City and is situated close to the base of Tokyo Tower. Zojoji Temple was founded by the monk Yuyo Shoso shonin in 1393 as an orthodox and fundamental nembutsu seminary for the Jodo sect. It used to be a large-scale temple with more than 120 buildings and more than 100 dormitories, and structures such as the Important Cultural Property Sangedatsumon (Three Gates of Liberation) that escaped damage from the war and the reconstructed main hall give an indication of the temple’s former glory. Tokyo Tower can be seen in the background behind the main hall, making this a popular photo spot. Inside the temple is the mausoleum of the Tokugawa family which contains six of the 15 Tokugawa shoguns.

    Right at the heart of Tokyos Central Business District, you could get here via 3 subway lines - Onariomon Station or Shiba-Koen Station, Daimon Station on the Oedo subway line and by JR line - a...

  • Sengakuji
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    4.5
    620 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Minato-ku Takanawa 2-11-1
    This is a temple of the Soto sect known for containing the cemetery of Asano Naganori and the 47 Akoroshi (Akogishi) warriors famous for “Chushingura” the story of how they avenged the death of their master ending in their death. It is a temple built in 1612 by Tokugawa Ieyasu in outer Sakurada to mourn for Imagawa Yoshimoto. After being destroyed by fire the temple was moved to Takanawa, Minato City in Tokyo. On the grounds there is Ako Gishi's Memorial Hall, a memorial hall for the Akogishi Warriors and many artefacts are on display. Many people visit the temple in the spring and winter when a festival for the warriors is held.

    great opportunity to know more about the 47 ronins.! Yeah, they really existed!. You will take about 45 minutos to know this place that is one block from metro station.

  • Gotoku-ji Temple
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    4.5
    404 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Setagaya-ku Goutokuji 2-24-7
    A Soto Buddhist temple located in 2 Chome Gotokuji, Setagaya City, Tokyo. The temple was built in 1480 by Kira Masatada, then lord of Setagaya Castle. According to a historical anecdote, a man named Ii Naotaka, the second lord of Hikone Domain (which also ruled Setagaya subsequently), escaped being struck by lightning after a cat beckoned him to enter the temple, and thus the temple is also said to be the origin of Japan's famed maneki-neko beckoning cat figures. Countless beckoning cat figures are arranged around the temple's grounds, and many tourists visit the temple to see this stunning sight.

    Quite a walk but then it is a peaceful area. With many great pic spots. I put a small neko with my name there. Friendly people at the temple a totally worth the time to go.

  • Ikegami Honmonji Temple
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    4.0
    273 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Ota-ku Ikegami 1-1-1
    This is the head temple of the Nichiren school of Buddhism which is located in Ota City, Tokyo and is known as the temple where Saint Nichiren passed away (his deathbed). After the death of saint Nichiren, the then lord of Musashi Province, Ikegami Munenaka donated the temple grounds. On the grounds, there are many cultural assets of national importance such as the Ikegami Honmonji five-storied pagoda and a wooden seated statue of the Saint Nichiren. There are many Tangible Cultural Properties existing within Tokyo. A commemoration of the death of Saint Nichiren held on the 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th of October every year to commemorate his death which occurred on the 13th—the “Oeshiki ceremony”—is celebrated at many places throughout the country but the most prestigious festival is conducted here on the evening of the 12th when some 300,000 people gather to visit the shrine. The highlight is the “Mando” (Buddhist lantern festival) rite in which about 3,000 people carry sacred lanterns decorated with cherry blossoms, called the “Mando neri kuyo” or Buddhist lantern procession. The nearest station to the temple is Ikegami Station.

    I would love to recommend to visit this temple, the architectural view is excellent and one feel vibe if they move on that place. group of people can easily move and can observe the beauty.

  • Izumo Oyashiro Tokyo Bunshi shrine
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    3.5
    61 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Minato-ku Roppongi 7-18-5
    A Shinto shrine located at 7 Chome Roppongi, Minato City, Tokyo. The shrine is jointly dedicated to the god Okuninushi no Okami together with the Izumo Oyashiro shrine in Shimane Prefecture. The shrine is famous for being one of the first Shinto shrines in Tokyo to hold Shinto-style weddings in the Meiji period.

    not an easy place to find, needed google map to get to this shrine, this is the shrine to pray for love.

  • Takahata Fudoson
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    4.0
    192 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Hinoshi Takahata 733
    This temple located in the Takahata district of Tokyo’s Hino City is the special head temple of the Chisan sect of Shingon Buddhism and its official name is “Takahatasan Myooin Kongo-ji Temple.” It was opened in the early Heian Period (794–1185) by Ennin (Jikaku Daishi) as a sacred ground for Tokan Chingo. Attracting faith as one of the Kanto region’s three largest fudo temples, it retains many important cultural properties such as the Fudo-do hall and its principal image of Fudo-myo’o (Acala), and the Niomon (Deva gate) with Kongo rikishi (Deva kings) statues on either side. The stone monument and bronze statue of Shinsengumi member Hijikata Toshizo (a military leader who helped Japan modernize in the transition from feudalism known as the Meiji Restoration of 1868) is another highlight. The temple is visited by many worshipers for hatsu-mode (New Year’s visit), the temple festival held on the 28th of each month, and the mountain hydrangea season in June.

    Hidden gem, I would highly recommend going around the area. And to the high view points, where you can get beautiful views of the shrines

  • Takao-san Yakuo-in Temple
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    4.0
    8 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Hachioujishi Takaomachi 2177
    This is a temple located on Mt. Takao in Tokyo’s Hachioji City. It is reported to have been established in 744 under the direction of Emperor Shomu, and was founded by the priest Gyoki. It is known for being one of the big three head temples of the Chisan School of the Shingon sect in the Kanto region, along with Naritasan Shinshoji Temple and Kawasaki Daishi Heikenji Temple. As of 1375 the principal image of the temple has been Izuna Daigongen, a form of the Buddhist deity Fudo Myo-o, and he was revered as the guardian deity of the samurai commanders in the Sengoku (Warring States) period. The temple is the site of many legends about tengu (long-nosed demon-like imaginary creatures) and the temple is considered to be a place that answers prayer for better fortune and offers talisman to ward off evil spirits. Visitors can also make reservations to try shojin-ryori (Buddhist vegetarian cuisine) on the temple grounds that are full of nature.

    山道から本堂に行くまでの間に、天狗の像や様々な石碑がとても多くありました。本堂でも天狗の巨大なお面があったのが、とても印象的でした。ケーブルカーを使えばアクセスも良いためとても人が多かったです。とりあえずお参りだけして、山頂を目指しました。本堂の手前にはソフトクリームなども売られていてお子さんにも人気のようでした。

  • Kogan-ji Temple (Togenuki Jizoson)
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    4.0
    236 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Toshima-ku Sugamo 3-35-2
    This Soto Buddhist temple is popularly called the Togenuki Jizoson. A statue of the bodhisattva Kshitigarbha, donated by a man in prayer for his wife’s recovery from illness after childbirth, is the temple’s principle object of worship. Legend has it that when a piece of paper with an image of the bodhisattva was floated on a river, his wife was healed. Based on this legend, it is said that affixing a piece of washi paper with the statue’s image imprinted on it sold at the temple to an injured area will hill the injury. A bronze statue called the “Washing Kannon” also stands on the temple grounds which is believed to cure illness.

    I went and they had awesome sights for a temple and its in Tokyo!!so the sights and feel was authentic Japanese!! I did some worshiping and yeah!! sugamo is kinda like the grandparents area for...

  • Kishimojin
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    4.0
    224 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    3-15-20 Miscellaneous Shogo Gorge Toshima-ku, Tokyo
    A shrine which worships Kishimojin, the goddess of easy childbirth and child rearing. The name of the shrine’s famed osen dango (sweet dumplings) is a play on words—Kishimojin had one thousand (sen) children (ko – changed to “go” in dango), and thus these little treats also serve as a prayer to be blessed with children. The gingko trees on the shrine grounds are said to be some 700 years old and have been designated Natural Monuments by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government. The Oeshiki Taisai festival commemorating the Buddhist priest Nichiren’s death is held at the shrine each year from October 16 to 18. During the festival, the approach to the shrine is lined with bustling street stalls.

    Kishimojin (Hariti) was originally a Persian (Iran) child eating demon, who converted to Buddhism and wowed to protect the faithful and especially children. This deity is hence very popular among...

  • Arai Yakushi Baisho-in Temple
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Nakano-ku Arai 5-3-5
    A Buddhist temple located in Arai, Nakano City, Tokyo. The official title of the temple is Araisan Baisho-in; it is also popularly known as the Arai Yakushi. The temple's principal object of worship, ordinarily hidden from general view, is a sculpture of Bhaisajyaguru and Cintamani-cakra merged into one (the sculpture is only revealed during the year of the tiger according to the Chinese zodiac). After Tokugawa Masako, the son of the second Tokugawa shogun Hidetada, was cured of an eye illness through prayer here, the temple came to be known for healing eye diseases. The temple is also believed to aid in childrearing and healing child illnesses.
  • Bishamonten Zenkoku-ji Temple
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    4.0
    219 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Shinjuku-ku Kagurazaka 5-36
    Bishamonten is a Nichiren school of Buddhism temple which Tokugawa Ieyasu built in 1595 in an act of founding a place of spiritual protection for the state. In 1793, it was relocated to its current location, Kagurazaka. The principal image of worship at the temple is Bishamonten (Japanese name for Vaiśravaṇa, a Buddhist deity) which has been designated as a Tangible Cultural Property by Shinjuku City. The faithful have since ancient times called it “Bishamon-sama of Kagurazaka”. The Gokaicho (honoring and unveiling of Buddhist image) of the Bishamonten statues is held each year in January, May and September on the day of the Tiger. During the New Year, it is one of the temples of “the tour of the Seven Deities of Good Fortune in Yamanote”, which is when worshippers visit seven temples to pray for happiness.

    Very impressive wooden designs and live prayer sessions. Observed quite a few groups come in and participate in ceremonies. You see at your leisure.

  • Otori-jinja Shrine (Asakusa Tori-no-ichi Fair)
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Taitou-ku Senzoku 3-18-7
    "This shrine on Kokusai-dori Street is approximately seven minutes on foot from Iriya Station. It's famous Tori-no-ichi Fair has been held since the Edo Period (1603-1868). The shrine's widely known by the familiar name ""Otorisama,"" and it hosts the Yoimiya-matsuri Festival and the Tojitsu-sai Festival annually in November. They give out little rake-shaped talismans at the first beating of the drum at midnight during the fair. These are meant to bring good luck and business prosperity. They also give out oval netsuke ornaments made of pure gold to the first three parishioners to arrive. The shrine is part of the Pilgrimage to 8 Shrines in Shitamachi and Asakusa Seven Lucky Gods circuits that people walk to boost their fortunes. The grounds have stone literary monuments dedicated to writers Higuchi Ichiyo and Masaoka Shiki. "
  • Naritasan Fukagawafudoudou temple
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Koutou-ku Tomioka 1-17-13
    The Tokyo branch temple of the Buddhist Daihonzan Naritasan Shinshoji Temple in Narita City, Chiba Prefecture. Since ancient times, this temple has been popularly known by the honorific nickname “Fukagawa no o-Fudou-sama.” The temple’s principle object of worship is a figure of Acala which is believed by many to ward away evil. With the submission of the proper application form to the temple office, anyone may attend the temple’s goma ceremony in which cedar wood is burned before the statue of Acala in prayer for a blessing. Visitors may also participate in traditional sutra copying and Buddhist imagery tracing.
  • Koyasan Tokyo Betsuin Temple
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    4.0
    44 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Minato-ku Takanawa 3-15-18
    A Buddhist temple located at 3 Chome Takanawa, Minato City, Tokyo. The temple was originally built in 1673 as the Koyasan Edo Zaibansho Kouya-ji temple. In 1927 the temple was designated a branch temple (betsuin) of the Kongobu-ji Temple, the head temple of Shingon Buddhism. Today, the temple is also popularly known as the Takanawa Musubi Daishi.

    Located on the opposite corner to the Takanawa Fire Department Building and behind the Takanawa Police Station you will find this large and impressive temple.Worth a look.This is a branch of a large...

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