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Shrine Spots in Japan

  • Ise Jingu
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    4.5
    2653 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Mie Pref. Iseshi Ujitachichou 1
    This shrine in Ise City is the Honshuji of the Jinja Honcho (Association of Shinto Shrines). Its official name is simply Jingu, and it has been familiarly called O-Ise-san since long ago. The name “Jingu” is actually used as a general term to refer to 125 jinja (shinto shrines) including the two shogu of Naiku, dedicated to Amaterasu-Omikami, and Geku, dedicated to Toyo’uke-no-Omikami as well as other betsugu (associated shrines) and setsumatsu-sha (auxiliary or subsidiary shrines). When making a pilgrimage to Ise, the official order of the pilgrimage is to enter the Naiku from the Geku. Once every 20 years the shaden (the main building of a Shinto shrine) of the Naiku, Geku and 14 other betsugu are reconstructed and the enshrined objects are transferred from the old to the new structures.

    Came here on a bright sunny day. A natures peaceful walk. Be respectful regardless if you believe or not. Take bow before you enter the gates and go through the gates, not around it. There’s a hand...

  • Izumo Oyashiro
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    3.5
    3 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Shimane Pref. Izumoshi Taishachoukidukihigashi 195
    This is a shrine in Izumo City, Shimane Prefecture, enshrining the great Okuninushi, known as a god of marriage. It is also known by its official name Izumo Oyashiro. There are several legends about the foundation of the shrine including one that says it was built as a condition for Okuninushi transferring over the land of Japan. The main shrine is designated as a national treasure, and features Japan’s oldest shrine architectural style. It is rebuilt about every 60 years. The kagura hall is famous for the largest shimenawa (sacred rope) in Japan. The magnificent row of pine trees called “Pine Baba” is designated as one of Japan’s top 100 pine spots.

    出雲大社には、大鳥居、勢溜の鳥居、松の参道の鳥居、4つ目の銅の鳥居の4つの鳥居があります。この銅の鳥居をくぐると、もうすぐ本殿です。

  • Fushimi Inari Taisha
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    4.5
    24116 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Fushimi-ku Fukakusa Yabunouchi cho 68
    This shrine in Fushimi Ward, Kyoto City, is the head of all Inari Shrines in Japan, which total to around 30,000 shrines. The shrine is particularly famous for its vermillion lacquered Torii gate tunnels, as well as to parishioners visiting the god for business, harvest, and fortune. Many of the buildings on the grounds are also painted with brilliant vermillion lacquer including the front shrine, main shrine, and tower gate, which has been designated an Important Cultural Properties of Japan. The torii gate corridor, said to consist of several thousand to 10,000 torii gates, twists and turns making it quite the spectacle. Beyond that is the rear shrine as well as the entrance to Mt. Inari-san which is dotted with countless small burial mounds. It is one of the most famous spots in the Kansai region to visit for the annual New Year Shrine Visit and draws huge numbers of visitors every year.

    Though it is crowded the temple and the gates are amazing. It drizzled and so I didnt go uphill it became slippery and muddy. Be sure to check the weather first. Below the temple are the mini shops...

  • Nikko Toshogu Shrine
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    3.5
    3 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tochigi Pref. Nikkoushi Sannai 2301
    A shrine located in Sannai, Nikko City. It was founded in 1617 as a shrine dedicated to the Tosho Daigongen (Tokugawa Ieyasu). There are many buildings including eight National Treasures and 34 Important Cultural Properties in the shrine grounds as well as the beautifully adorned and richly colored carvings of the Three Wise Monkeys—Mizaru, Iwazaru and Kikazaru (see no evil, speak no evil and hear no evil)—and the Nemuri-neko (sleepy cat) attributed to Hidari Jingoro. Nikko Toshogu is also registered as a World Heritage Site as one of the Shrines and Temples of Nikko.

    This is a quiet temple just steps from the museum. Built as a temporary location for the deities while the main temple was under repair in the early 1600s, this shrine was kept and made permanent. If...

  • Dazaifu Tenmangu shrine
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    4.0
    2 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Fukuoka Pref. Dazaifushi Saifu 4-7-1
    The head shrine of 12,000 Shinto shrines across the country dedicated to Sugawara no Michizane, known as the god of scholarship. The shrine’s origin lies in the deification of when Michizane, who passed away in this area in 903, was later deified and the main shrine building dedicated to him was erected in 919. The shrine’s charms, said to bring success in academic affairs, and paper talismans themed after the famous Tobiume plum tree said to have flown to the shrine in yearning for Michizane, are popular purchases among visitors. The best time to see the 6,000 Chinese plum trees on the shrine’s grounds is from the end of January to the beginning of March. A five-minute walk from Dazaifu Station.

    太宰府を参拝し、敷地内を散策していて、太宰府天満宮文書館なる建物を見つけました。 どうやら、建物はあるものの一般公開はしていないようです。

  • Atsuta Jingu (Atsuta Shrine)
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    4.0
    1722 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Aichi Pref. Nagoyashi Atsuta-ku Jingu 1-1-1
    This shrine located in Nagoya City’s Atsuta Ward has been known familiarly as “Atsuta Sama” since long ago. Reported to have been established in 113, it is revered as a Great Shrine ranking second only to Ise Jingu Shrine. The shrine is famous as a place that enshrines the sacred sword Kusanagi-no-tsurugi, one of the three sacred treasures that symbolize the Imperial throne. The approximately 190,000-square meter premises are thick with kusunoki (camphor trees) that have been living for more than one thousand years, and are scattered with numerous setsumatsu-sha (smaller shrines managed under the shrine). There are numerous events and festivals held at the shrine including Hatsu Ebisu on January 5, and it is constantly bustling with visitors for Shichi-Go-San (shrine visit by children aged 7, 5 and 3), omiya-mairi (the first shrine visits by babies) and even Hatsu Mode (the first shrine visit of New Year).

    We arrived 1400h. There was only two tour buses. The rest were locals. So it was pretty quiet. It can get very crowded on special occasions and different season. It was a lovely walk and offering of...

  • Itsukushima Shrine (Miyajima)
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    4.5
    3438 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Hiroshima Pref. Hatsukaichishi Miyajimachou 1-1
    A Shinto shrine located on the island of Itsukushima (Miyajima) in Hatsukaichi City, Hiroshima Prefecture famed as one of the three most scenic locations in Japan. The shrine is also registered as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. This grand and majestic shrine is built along the sea shore where the tide ebbs and flows, and the shrine’s giant torii gate standing out in the sea is particularly famous. The shrine is said to have been built in 593, and the current seaside shrine building is said to have been constructed with the aid of Taira no Kiyomori in 1168. 17 of the shrine’s large and small structures are designated Important Cultural Properties or National Treasures, and the shrine’s Hirabutai stage, used for ceremonial dances and other performances, is considered one of the three most beautiful stages in the country. The shrine’s collection of treasures also includes numerous crafts and works of art designated Important Cultural Properties and National Treasures.

    This was one of the best shrines I have seen. It’s worth a visit. We went during low tide so we couldn’t see it when water covers it (they say it looks like it’s floating) but it was nice to see it...

  • Ise Jingu Naiku
    Travel / Tourism
    Mie Pref. Iseshi Ujitachichou 1
    This is the other one of Ise Jingu’s shogu, officially called Kotaijingu. It is considered to have begun when the imperial princess Yamato-hime-no-miya determined that Amaterasu Omikami would be enshrined on the banks of the Isuzugawa River. Crossing over the Ujibashi Bridge and proceeding along the long gravel path that approaches the shrine over which Japanese cedar trees tower, one will arrive at the o-seiden (main building), which is enclosed by multiple layers of fencing. The vast grounds include a kagura hall, betsugu (an associated shrine), and free rest areas for worshippers, and the entire area is enveloped in a sacred atmosphere. Visitors can take a bus from Isuzugawa Station or Ujiyamada Station and get off at the Naiku-mae stop.
  • Meiji Shrine
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    4.5
    8069 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Shibuya-ku
    This Shinto shrine is dedicated to Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken, and its grounds consist of an inner and outer garden as well as the Meiji Kinenkan, which can be used as a venue for weddings and other ceremonies. A lush forest occupies the inner garden area; beloved as a rare green space in the heart of Tokyo, highlights include the magnificent Honden front shrine; wooden torii gate which is the largest in Japan; the Gyoen garden, which requires a small fee to enter but which is beautiful year-round; and the Kiyomasa Well (located in the Gyoen garden), from which samurai lord Kato Kiyomasa personally drew water. The outer garden is a Japanese-style garden which preserves how the area looked when it was still largely wilderness; highlights include a broadleaf tree-enshrouded walking path; South Pond on which bloom lotuses; and some 1,500 Japanese iris plants spanning 150 varieties which Emperor Meiji had planted for Empress Shoken - the best time to see the irises is from late May through mid-June. The outer garden spans Shinjuku Ward and Minato Ward and its facilities include the free Meiji Memorial Picture Gallery, as well as tennis courts, a baseball stadium, and a variety of other sports facilities. In Fall 2019 as part of events commemorating the shrine's 100th anniversary, the Meiji Jingu Museum was opened to display treasures connected to Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken which were formerly kept in the Meiji Jingu Homotsuden (Treasure Museum).

    very good to walk around see the intricate work of art of this shrine for its Japanese architecture and one can see people all over the world.

  • Mitsumine-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    17 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Saitama Pref. Chichibushi Mitsumine 298-1
    Mitsumine-jinja Shrine (literally meaning “three peaks shrine”), so called by that name because of the three peaks of Mt. Kumotori, Mt. Shiraiwa and Mt. Myohogatake which can be seen overlooking the eastern side of the shrine are beautifully positioned in a line. The god worshipped at the shrine is in fact Gokenzoku, the wolf and so the shrine is affectionately known as the Oinusama, meaning “honorable wolf deity”. There is also Mitsumineyama Museum in the shrine’s precincts with exhibits and treasures relating to mountain worship and temple retreat on display.

    寺伝によると、736年に光明皇后は諸国の霊山に観音を祀られ、祈願されたそうです。三峯神社にも別殿を造立し、観音像を安置されたのが小教院の始まりとされています。改修され、三峯神社境内にあるアンティーク喫茶店として憩いのひとときを提供してくれます。三峯山の岩清水を使ったコーヒーが人気です。

  • Samukawa-jinja Shrine
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    4.0
    233 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Kouzagunsamukawamachi Miyayama 3916
    This shrine in Miyayama, Samukawa Town, Koza County, Kanagawa Prefecture has a roughly 1,600 history. Called Sagaminokuni Ichinomiya, its guardian deity is the only in the nation to protect from calamity whatever direction it comes from. As such, historical figures like Minamoto no Yoritomo, Takeda Shingen, and members of the Tokugawa clan worshiped there. Many visitors come for a variety of annual festivals, including the Musayumi Festival on the 8th of the New Year, the Kokufu Festival on May 5, and the Hamaorikoshiki Festival on July 15.

    This is probably most amazing but under rated shrine near Tokyo. English translation or notice are limited (none for some area) but beautiful buildings and tranquil set ups are breathtaking. Lots...

  • Tokyo Daijingu
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    4.0
    429 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Chiyoda-ku Fujimi 2-4-1
    Built in 1880 as a shrine to worship the deities of Ise Shrine, this shrine is well known for being “O-Ise-sama in Tokyo.” Initially it was located in Hibiya, but relocated to Tokyo’s Chiyoda City after the Great Kanto Earthquake. The main deities enshrined are Amaterasu-Sume-Okami and Toyouke-no-Okami. It is also popular as a wedding venue as it is a shrine that originated Shinto weddings. It is visited by many worshippers who pray for good candidates for marriage. In addition to its main festival held every year in April, there are many smaller events held each month.

    Tokyo Daijingu is one of the five major shrines in Tokyo dedicated to all things related to love and relationships. This was the first Shrine holding Shinto wedding ceremony in Japan. Worshippers...

  • Hakone-jinja Shrine
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    4.5
    3 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kanagawa Pref. Ashigarashimogunhakonemachi Motohakone 80-1
    Since ancient times, this shrine has been patronized by generations of military commanders who came to pray for the earnest realization of their wishes during battle. This shrine is said to be one of the best power spots in the Kanto region where one can “conquer a state when Hakone has your back”. The deity of love, Kuzuryu’s newly constructed shrine is also next to Hakone Shrine. Get off the Izu Hakone bus at “Moto-Hakone” or otherwise get off the Hakone Tosan bus at “Moto-Hakone Port” and the temple is a 10- minute walk away.

    In the site of Hakone Shrine, this small museum is located. The museum exhibits not so many items, but their treasures are quite interesting with historical value. Ancient documents, swords, paints...

  • Shimogamo-jinja Shrine
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    4.5
    66 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Shimogamoizumigawachou 59
    Formally titled the Kamomioya Shrine, this historic Shinto shrine is one of Kyoto’s oldest. The entire grounds of the shrine are registered as part of the “Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto” World Heritage listing. Dedicated to the guardian deity of Kyoto as well as the guardian deity of woman’s duties, since ancient times the shrine has been seen as providing divine aid in receiving guidance, achieving victory, and starting new projects. The grounds are also dotted with women-oriented shrines and sites, such as the Aioi-sha, a shrine dedicated to luck in marriage, and Kawai Shrine, a guardian shrine for women.

    It is amazing that there is such a nature in the center of Kyoto. Tadasuno Mori, which extends beside Shimogamo Shrine, is a wonderful place that you can can contact with woods, creeks and more. I...

  • Jonan-gu Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Fushimi-ku Nakajimatobarikyuchou 7
    A Shinto shrine in Fushimi Ward, Kyoto City known as Katayoke no taisha (the Direction Warding Shrine). Emperor Shirakawa had a grand villa built here in the Heian period after his retirement, making the area into a political and cultural center. Rites were conducted here to pray for the emperor’s safety when he traveled to visit the temples of Kumano and the temple is still strongly popular among the faithful today for providing divine aid with construction, manufacturing, moving to a new location, traveling, and traffic safety. Visitors can enjoy seasonal flowers in the temple’s spacious garden. The temple holds Kyokusui no utage (Meandering Stream Banquets) in spring and autumn, events which are famed as displays of imperial elegance.
  • Koami Shrine
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Chuou-ku Nihombashikoamichou 16-23
    A Shinto shrine located in Nihombashikoami-cho, Chuo City, Tokyo. Dedicated to Inari, the fox god, the shrine has long been known for providing good luck and protection from misfortune. There is a well on the shrine grounds named the Zeniarai no I and popularly known as the Tokyo Zeniarai Benten (money washing well and Tokyo money washing Benten, respectively) which is believed to grant financial luck to those who purify money in its waters; there's also a figure of the tall-headed god Fukurokuju said to reward worshipers with virtue.
  • Heian Jingu Shrine
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    4.0
    1196 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Okazakinishitennouchou
    A Shinto shrine located in Sakyo Ward in Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture which was erected in 1895 to commemorate the 1,100th anniversary of the foundation of the ancient capital of Heian-Kyo. The shrine is dedicated to Emperor Kammu and Emperor Komei. The main shrine building is a 5/8th scale replica of the Heian-Kyo government reception hall used during the time of Emperor Kammu. The shrine’s solemn vermillion lacquered buildings roofed with green glazed tiles and the white gravel covering the grounds are a spectacle to behold. The surrounding Japanese garden is strolling garden built around a central pond which is divided into four separate sections filled with splendid flowering plants and trees appropriate to the four seasons. The shrine is also famous for its weeping cherry trees in spring.

    Heian Shrine was built in 1895 in the 1100th anniversary celebration on the founding of city of Kyoto. It had been ranked as a Beppyo Jinjo by the Association of Shinto Shrine. It was particularly...

  • Kifune-jinja Shrine
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    4.5
    674 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Kyoto Kyoutoshi Sakyou-ku Kuramakibunechou 180
    This shrine in Sakyo Ward, Kyoto City, is the head shrine for the Kifune-Shrines in Japan which number almost 500 shrines. Long been known for the god of rain it has also gained faith from the chefs, cooking industry, and water industries of Japan. Therefore, unlike the regional name of Kibune, the name of the shrine is read as Kifune. The middle shrine located between the main shrine and the rear shrine enshrines the goddess Iwanaga-hime, a goddess of marriage and matchmaking, and is therefore popular amongst young couples.

    The stair view leading to the shrine is one of the most beautiful shot but other than that, there is nothing much up the temple. Besides, there will be constant flow of crowds during peak season...

  • Kasuga Taisha Shrine
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    4.5
    1720 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Nara Pref. Narashi Kasuganochou 160
    This is a Shinto shrine located in Nara City. Kasuga Taisha Shrine is the grand head shrine of approximately 1,000 Kasuga shrines nationwide. The origins to the shrine lie in the early days of the Nara period, when Takemikazuchi-no-mikoto from Kashima-jingu Shrine was enshrined at Mt. Mikasa. The main shrine of the Kasuga structure which is a National Treasure has four buildings lined up, and in addition to the majestic and splendid south Gate and middle gate, there are many things such as fine and industrial art objects which have been designated as Important Cultural Properties. The Bantoro Festival (Lantern Festival) event is held on the day of Setsubun (Bean throwing night) and on the 14th and 15th of August when around 3,000 stone lanterns and hanging lanterns are lit with fire, and many worshipers come to look at this magical sight.

    This temple is not on everyones list, but its situation surrounded by forest makes it special. The complex is easily reached in the South East of Nara Park, only maybe 15 minutes walk from Todaiji...

  • Yasukuni Shrine
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    4.0
    1589 Reviews
    Travel / Tourism
    Tokyo Chiyoda-ku Kudankita 3-1-1
    This shrine located in Kudankita of Chiyoda City mainly enshrines soldiers and civilians related to the military who died in service of the country. From patriots at the end of the Edo period and the Meiji Restoration to soldiers that died in combat during the Pacific War, Yasukuni enshrines over 2,466,000 spirits without distinction as to social status, merits or gender. About 400 cherry trees have been planted on the premises, making it a famous spot for hanami (cherry blossom viewing).

    Built as a memorial to all Japanese war dead from the Russo Japanese War onward. The shrine is held in high esteem and also in controversy as it represents the nation aggression in Asia. A huge...

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